The Village Development Plan of Ebeagwa, Tayor and Edjuingang Villages


Research Paper (undergraduate), 2009

59 Pages


Excerpt

TABLE OF CONTENTS

LIST OF TABLES

LIST OF ANNEXES

LIST OF ACRONYMS

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

CHAPTER INTRODUCTION OF THE VILLAGE
1.1 Location
1.2 Accessibility
1.3 Climate and Vegetation
1.4 Livelihood Activities
1.5 Development Concerns and potentials

CHAPTER BACKGROUND INFORMATION
2.1 Ethnicity
2.2 Population and structure
2.3 Historical analysis
2.4 Historical Timeline
2.5 Sources and levels of Income
2.6 Income and expenditure
2.7 Village Institutions and organisations
2.8 Social Amenities
2.9 Social Problems
2.10 Past and current development projects and partners involved

CHAPTER LIVELIHOOD ACTIVITIES
3.1 Cocoa
3.2 Oil Palm
3.3 Plantains
3.4 Cocoyam
3.5 Banana
3.6 Cassava
3.7 Oranges
3.8 Petty Trading
3.9 Productivity Trend
3.10 Seasonal calendar
3.11 Potentials for reinforcing existing opportunities

CHAPTER PARTICIPATORY LAND USE MAP & LAND TENURE SYSTEM
4.1 Participatory Land Use Map
4.2 Land Tenure System
4.2.1 Land tenure system
Participatory Land Use Map

CHAPTER NEED ASSESSMENT AND COMMUNITY VISION
5.1: Problems and Needs
5.2: Shared Community Vision

CHAPTER PLANNED ACTIVITIES AND OUTLINE OF PRIORITY PROJECTS
Strategic plans
6.2: List of priority projects

CHAPTER CONCLUSIONS AND RECOMMENDATIONS
7.1 CONCLUSION
7.2 RECOMMENDATIONS

LIST OF TABLES

Table 1: Population Structure by Gender

Table 2: Trend Analysis

Table 3: Historical Time line

Table 4: Sources and levels of income

Table 5: Income and expenditure matrix

Table 6: Areas and estimates of expenditure/annum

Table7: Village Organizations

Table 8: Past and current development projects and partners involved

Table 9: Average Productivity Trend per Household

Table10: Seasonal Calendar

Table 11: Problem identification by gender and sector

Table 12: Problem prioritization by gender and sector

Table 13: Problem Prioritization Matrix by Sector and Gender

Table 14: Problem Causes and Effects

Table15: Proposed solutions to problems

Table 16: Impact matrix Gender and time scale for 6 priority projects

LIST OF ANNEXES

Annex 1: Stakeholder Identification

Annex 2: Annual Implementation Plan

Annex 3: IMPACT OF LIVELIHOOD ACTIVITIES ON ENVIRONMENT

Annex 4: Monitoring and Evaluation Plan

Annex 5: SWOT ANALYSIS

Annex 6: Village Planning Team

Annex 7: The roles, responsibilities and establishment of the village planning team (VPT)

Annex 8: Problem trees

Annex 10: Social infrastructures

Annex 11: Micro-Project profile

Annex 12: LIST OF FIELD TEAM

LIST OF ACRONYMS

illustration not visible in this excerpt

EXECUTIVE SUMMARY

A village development plan is a document that outlines development procedures prepared by a village that can be used to mobilise potentials; capacities and allocation of resources. The goal is to move a village from their present situation to a desired one in an orderly and acceptable manner within a given time frame. It is a systematic approach that aims at sustainable management of natural resources and livelihood development at the village level. It is aimed at creating an environment for investors of the village in the long run.

The development planning process of Ebeagwa, Tayor and Edjuingang villages lasted for ten days. The assignment was facilitated by facilitators from ENPADI-NGO. It was guided by a manual for the elaboration of VDPs prepared by the capacity building component of Rumpi. This VDP creates a venue for both technical services and financial bodies to be involved and to play different roles in community development. It is developed in the context whereby the village community is the committed owner and driver of the development process.

Ebeagwa, Tayor and Edjuingang villages are found within the Tinto Municipality, located within the Upper Bayang sub-division in the Manyu Division of the South West Region the area has an estimated population of 4,700 inhabitants. Agriculture is the backbone of the economy of these villages. Revenue is generated mainly from the sales of cocoa and palm oil, which constitutes the main source of income to the farmers. Other crops cultivated include; coco yams, yams, corn, egusi, cassava, vegetables etc.

The VDP of Ebeagwa, Tayor and Edjuingang villages comprises of seven chapters. Chapter one introduces the community, chapter two, three and four gives information on the background, livelihood activities, and participatory land use map and land tenure system respectively. Chapter and six give needs for assessment, community vision and also outline priority projects, while chapter seven gives the general conclusion and recommendation of the VDP.

Based on data collection and analysis, problems are addressed in the sectors of health, agriculture, environment and infrastructure. The problems are:

-Prevalence of water borne diseases
-High death rates
-Inadequate farm implements
-Low output from local varieties of cocoa seedlings
-Difficulties in the processing of cocoa as drying depends on sunlight

To address the problems raised above, strategic plans were adopted. The following solutions were highlighted as urgent needs of the problem that were raised. These are;

-Provide pipe born water
-Provide farm tools
-Provide improved cocoa seedlings/pods
-Provide improved plantain suckers
-Provide cocoa oven
-Provide a health centre

The above solution could be achieved through concerted efforts, careful planning, resource mobilisation, management in partnership with interested stakeholders and partner organisations in other to consolidate the current development efforts.

CHAPTER INTRODUCTION OF THE VILLAGE

1.1 Location

Ebeagwa, Tayor and Edjuingang villages are found in the Tinto Municipality, located within the Upper Bayang sub-division, in Manyu Division of the southwest region of Cameroon. The area lies between latitudes 50 30/ 0// - 50 45/ 0// North and longitudes 90 30/.0// - 90 45/ 0// East[1]. These villages are bounded to the North by Ekpor and Mbanga Pongo, South by Mambo and Bara, West by Kepele and East by Atibong Wire village. The area has an estimated population of 4,700 inhabitants

1.2 Accessibility

These villages can be accessed from Mamfe town through Tinto. The distance from Mamfe town to Ebeagwa is about 79km. Due to the deplorable state of the road; transportation is mostly carried by commercial motor bikes. Ebeagwa, Tayor and Edjuingang can also be accessed from Menji by passing through villages such as Bechati, Mbanga-Pongo, Sabes, Agong and Ekpor villages.

1.3 Climate and Vegetation

The village lies in the humid forest zone of Cameroon with two distinct seasons - the rainy and the dry season. The rainy season last for eight months (March to October) and the dry season last for 4 months (November to February). Temperatures also are usually very high with average monthly temperature of about 270 C. The high temperatures coupled with abundant rainfall favours luxuriant growth of both cash and food crops.

1.4 Livelihood Activities

Farming constitutes the main income generating activity in the PU. The main crops cultivated are cocoa, oil palm, plantain, cassava, cocoyam and vegetables. Income is equally generated from the sales of NTFPs, palm wine tapping and petty trading. Fishing is also carried but on a rudimentary scale and is mostly destined for home consumption

1.5 Development Concerns and potentials.

In terms of development, Ebeagwa, Tayor and Edjuingang have two government primary schools and one government secondary school. The villages are also connected by earth roads which are motorable, but in a very bad state. The development problems faced by the villagers also include the absence of pipe borne water, health facilities and hydroelectricity.

The Ebeagwa Planification Unit is also endowed with a lot of potentials. The streams and rivers are rich in fish and some could be harnessed through gravity as a source of drinking water. Moreover, there is plenty of sand in these water bodies. There is timber in the forest and enough rocks which can be used for construction works. There is equally enough idle land which could be exploited to improve agricultural production and industrial development.

CHAPTER 2 BACKGROUND INFORMATION

2.1 Ethnicity

The people of Edjuingang and Ebeagwa villages belong to the Ndifaw whereas those of Tayor village are from the Nkokonock clan in the Upper Bayang subdivision. They speak both the Kenyang language. There are other tribes resident in these three villages. These tribes include; Bafoum (1), Bikom (1), Oku (2), Bangwa (4), Basack (1) and Ibos (3) from Nigeria. The non-indigenes constitute a total of 12 while 4088 are indigenes. The ethnic ratio is therefore 0.25 : 99.74

2.2 Population and structure

The population of all three villages is unevenly distributed. Ebeagwa has the largest population of about 2500 people. Tayor has a total population of about 1500 people, while Edjuingang has a total population of about 700 people. This gives a total population of about 4700 for the area. Table 2 below gives detailed information about the population structure. There are 2575 females and 2125 males. The male/female ratio, therefore stands at 45.21: 54.79

Table 1: Population Structure by Gender

illustration not visible in this excerpt

Source: Interview with Focus groups and Village Planning Team

2.3 Historical analysis

For development planning purpose, historical analysis is important to identify certain trends in a community. This assures and improves development visualisation. As indicated in Table 2, the population has increased a lot from the past 30 years. Other aspects such as farm sizes, forest cover, water, farm productivity and soil fertility have also experienced great changes. The main reasons for population growth are improvement in medical facilities, high birth rates, immigration, improved education and sanitation. The increase in population has otherwise led to continuous demand for land and therefore a reduction in farmland, forest cover and water bodies. Moreover, agricultural productivity has dropped due to over cultivation and poor farming methods which have led to loss of soil fertility. Rainfall variability, however, has not experienced significant changes.

Table 2: Trend Analysis

illustration not visible in this excerpt

Source: Interview with Focus groups and Village Planning Team

2.4 Historical Timeline

The historical timeline is important to verify events which might have affected or still have the potential to affect development. Table 3 shows the events that have occurred in the community for the past years.

Table 3: Historical Time line

illustration not visible in this excerpt

Source: Interview with Focus groups and Village Planning Team

2.5 Sources and levels of Income

Farming constitutes the main economic activity of the entire area. The major crops cultivated include cocoa, palm nuts, plantains, cassava, maize, coco yams and bananas. However, the major cash crops cultivated is cocoa and oil palm and they provide the greatest income compared to other crops cultivated (table 4). NTFP collection especially bush mango and njangsang also provide income to villagers. Palm wine and raffia is also practiced by most people in the village and it also provides a reasonable amount of income as seen in table 4 below.

Table 4: Sources and levels of income

illustration not visible in this excerpt

Source: Interview with Focus groups and Village Planning Team

2.6 Income and expenditure

Table 5 shows a calendar of income and expenditure for the village. It indicates the periods of the year when income is generated as well as months when villagers spend most. The income generating months are March– September. The villagers spend in July during their children’s graduation from schools. They also spend heavily in September and October when schools resume and in December and January which are festive periods (Christmas and New Year). Also from September – December, villagers spend in series of family and village festivities such as sack cloth removals and death ceremonies

Table 5: Income and expenditure matrix

illustration not visible in this excerpt

Source: Interview with Focus groups and Village Planning Team

Table 6: Areas and estimates of expenditure /annum

illustration not visible in this excerpt

Source: Interview with Focus groups and Village Planning Team

2.7 Village Institutions and organisations

Each of the three villages has a chief whose functions are being complemented by their traditional councils headed by a chairman. The traditional council (TC) is responsible for the day to day administration of the village. It disciplines the villagers and also takes care of the inter-village relationship These TCs are therefore the law and reinforcing organs of their respective villages. Table 7 shows the organization setup of each village

Table7: Village Organizations

illustration not visible in this excerpt

Source: Interview with Focus groups and Village Planning Team

Apart from the TCs which are the main law making institutions, there are secret societies that enforce legal rule in the village most especially among members. These societies include Epke and Obasinjom (male). Apart from these societies there are also organised farmers’ CIGs and social groups (Annex 9). The majority of the people are Christians belonging to various denominations: Catholic, Presbyterian, Apostolic, and Full Gospel Mission

2.8 Social Amenities

Social amenities in the area include mainly schools. These schools include; a day care centre in Edjuingang, one primary schools in all three villages and a government secondary school (GSS) in Ebeagwa. Moreover, there is the presence of the only market found in Ebeagwa, shared by all three villages and other neighbouring villages. Pipe borne water is found only in Tayor village, while the other villages fetch water from streams.

2.9 Social Problems

Market facilities available in the area are grossly insufficient. Only one market is found in Ebeagwa that serves all the three villages. More still the people of Tayor and Edjuingang are distant from the market. Though there is a pipe borne water in Tayor village, the flow is inconsistent during the rainy season due to sedimentation. Furthermore, the storage tank is dilapidated; Ebeagwa and Edjuingang on the other hand, depend on streams as a source of drinking water. These streams, however, are clean for drinking water, thus the reason of prevalence of water borne diseases

2.10 Past and current development projects and partners involved

Development projects that have taken place in these villages include; the construction of the Ebeagwa market in 1966 which was solely constructed by the villagers. In 1975, the people of Edjuingang and Ebeagwa were supposed to benefit from the Ndifor water project which ended up in dismay. Another project is the Tayor water project in 1999. The people of Tayor provide unskilled labour and local materials and also received external support from the Chinese government. In 2003, the village of Ebeagwa benefited from the contraction of a community hall. The villagers contributed local materials and unskilled labour, whereas the finances were gotten from timber royalties. That notwithstanding project of the hall is still pending due to mismanagement of funds. Government primary school Tayor is another project in Tayor village. The villagers contributed land, unskilled labour, local materials whereas the government provided the necessary finances. However the school still has inadequate classroom and teachers.

[...]


[1] Source: Interactive Forestry Atlas of Cameroon

[2] Quantities for some items could not be given because households could only remember the amount made per annum (This is because quantities are sold out of the peak season without necessarily using the standard measure).

Excerpt out of 59 pages

Details

Title
The Village Development Plan of Ebeagwa, Tayor and Edjuingang Villages
Authors
Year
2009
Pages
59
Catalog Number
V269166
ISBN (eBook)
9783656601944
ISBN (Book)
9783656601937
File size
1740 KB
Language
English
Tags
village, development, plan, ebeagwa, tayor, edjuingang, villages
Quote paper
Suinyuy Derrick Ngoran (Author)Anthony Banyouko Ndah (Author), 2009, The Village Development Plan of Ebeagwa, Tayor and Edjuingang Villages, Munich, GRIN Verlag, https://www.grin.com/document/269166

Comments

  • No comments yet.
Read the ebook
Title: The Village Development Plan of Ebeagwa, Tayor and Edjuingang Villages



Upload papers

Your term paper / thesis:

- Publication as eBook and book
- High royalties for the sales
- Completely free - with ISBN
- It only takes five minutes
- Every paper finds readers

Publish now - it's free