Assessment of the opportunities and challenges in the implementation of cooperative Training. The case of selected public Technical and Vocational Education and Training Colleges in Addis Ababa City Government


Master's Thesis, 2014
86 Pages

Excerpt

Table of Contents

Acknowledgment

Table of contents

List of Tables

List of Appendices

Acronyms

Abstract

CHAPTER ONE
1. INTRODUCTION
1.1 Background of the Study
1.2. Statement of the problem
1.3 .Basic questions
1.4 objective of the study
1.4.1 General objective
1.4.2 Specific Objectives
1.5. Significance of the study
1.6. Delimitations and Scope of the Study
1.7. Limitations ofthe Study
1.8. Definition of Terms
1.9. Organization of the study

CHAPTER TWO
2. REVIEW OF RELATED LITRATURE
2.1 Concept of Cooperative Training
2.2 TVET Obejctives on Cooperative Training
2.3 Basic Standards /Guidelines and Cooperative Training Agreement Documents
2.3.1 Guideline document
2.3.2 Memorandum of agreement between TVET institutions and Enterprises
2.3.3 The training contract document between Enterprise and trainee
2.4. Who is Involved in Cooperative Training?
2.5. Monitoring the Training Progress
2.6. Inspecting Cooperative Training Site
2.7 Responsibilities of participating parties in cooperative Training program
2.8 Benefits to partners involved in cooperative training program
2.8.1 Benefits to enterprises
2.8.2 Benefits to TVET institutions/colleges
2.8.3 Benefitstotrainees
2.9 Challenges in implementing cooperative training
2.9. Cooperative Training Program in some selected countries
2.9.1 The German cooperative training program
2.9.2 The cooperative training program in the Philippines
2.9.3 An Overview of Cooperative Training Program in Ethiopian TVET

CHAPTER THREE
3 . Research Design and Methodology
3.1 Research Design
3.2 Source ofData
3.2.1. Primary sources
3.2. 2. Secondary source
3.3 Data gathering Instruments
3.3.1 Questionnaires
3.3.2. Interview
3.4 Data Gathering Procedures
3.5. Population, Sample size and Sampling Techniques
3.5.1 Population
3.5.2 Sampling unit
3.5.3 Sampling techniques
3.5.4 Sample size
3.6 Data Analysis

CHAPTER FOUR

4 PRESENTATION AND ANALYSIS OF DAYA
4.1 Background ofRespondents
4.2 Selection, Arrangement and Placement of trainees on cooperative training enterprises .
4.3 Implementation of cooperative Training
4. 4 Extent of cooperative training delivery
4.5 Problems In Implementation Of Cooperative Training
4. 6. Opportunities in implementation of cooperative training

CHAPTER FIVE Summary, Conclusion and Recommendation

5.1 Summary of the Finding
5.2 conclusion
5.3 Recommendation

References

Appendix A

Appendix B

Appendix D

ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS

I avail this opportunity to express my sincere gratitude to my advisor Dr. Geberegzibher Debebe for his unreserved support and constructive criticism to complete the research. I believe that this research would not have been completed without his valuable assistance.

A profound debt of gratitude is also owed to my beloved and kindest sister Tigist Taye and my younger sister Kelemuwa Taye, for providing me financial and moral support throughout the program.

In addition, I would like to extend my appreciation to Ato Taye Alemu, Asrat Abebe, Abraham Tamir, Abera Mulatu for their support to carry out the research .

I am also indebted to Entoto Poly TVET College, Misrak poly TVET College, Nifas silk poly TVET College administration , Marathon Motor Engineering Enterprise, the Addis Ababa Vital events and residents service Office and Hibret Manufacturing and Machine Building Industry, trainers and trainees at Entoto ,Misrak and Nifas silk poly TVET Colleges for their collaboration in any of their concerns.

List of Tables

Table I: Characteristics of cooperative Trainees

Table II: Characteristics ofTrainers

Table III: Criteria for selection of cooperative training enterprises

Table IV: Assigning trainees to Cooperative training enterprises

Table V: Conditions for Trainees’ Transportation and Distance Cooperative Centers

Table VI: Placement ofTrainees and Orientation

Table VII: Views on Duration of Cooperative Training

Table VIII: Follow Up of Cooperative Training

Table IX: the extent of cooperative delivery

Table X: College Related problems of cooperative Training

Table XI: Suggestions to solve cooperative problems

List of Appendices

Appendix A-Questionnaires filled by Trainers

Appendix В -Questionnaire filled by Trainees

Appendix C- Interview guide for Deans, Vocational counselors/cooperative training coordinators

Appendix D - Interview guide for supervisors (owners) in cooperative training enterprises

ACRONYMS and ABREVATIONS

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ABSTRACT

The main purpose of the study was to assess the opportunities and challenges in the implementation of cooperative training in three government colleges in Addis Ababa City Government. To this end, an attempt was made to look in to the criterion for selecting and placement of trainees on cooperative training enterprises, arrangements and selection procedures of cooperative training enterprises , the extent of cooperative training delivery, the opportunities and challenges of implementing cooperative training were raised as basic question .Opinions and views of trainees , trainers, supervisors and deans on the adequacy and appropriateness of training period , evaluation and supervision of trainees at the work place , the extent of cooperative training delivery, the opportunities and challenges of implementing cooperative training were treated. The study employed descriptive analysis of the data collected in regular programs of the three colleges selected from Entoto Poly TVET College (EPTVETC), Misrak Poly TVET College (MPTVETC) and Nifas silk Poly TVET College(NPTVETC) .The subject of the study were 3 deans , 3 cooperative training coordinators/ vocational counselors, 185 trainers, 273 trainees and 3 cooperative training enterprises .Trainees and trainers were selected through stratified random sampling technique while deans, supervisors and coordinators of cooperative training were selected through purposive sampling techniques. The data gathered were organized using descriptive statistical analysis .The finding of the study revealed that availability of supervisor and occupation were widely used criterion to select cooperative training enterprises in EPTVETC and MPTVETC while interest of cooperative training enterprises was the dominant factor in selecting cooperative training enterprises for NPTVETC trainees .Placement of trainees to practice centers was done by agreement between colleges and cooperative training enterprises. Factors that affect the practice in the colleges include shortage of training materials , the low qualification of trainers, transport cost of trainees due to long distance they traveled for cooperative training. Moreover, the opportunities in the implementation of cooperative include , the existence of strategies , guidelines , potential enterprises in Addis Ababa and the emphasis of government towards cooperative training program. Cooperative training enterprises should pay incentives for trainees depending on the duration of training and type of occupation trainees engaged. Serious attention should be given in cooperative training so that trainees can gain adapt self-employment opportunities in the informal sectors.

CHAPTER ONE

1. INTRODUCTION

1.1 Background of the Study

As economic, social, and technological changes become faster, people everywhere need to develop their knowledge and skills, on a continuous basis, so that they can live and work meaningfully in the advanced society. Education and training contribute to an individual’s personal development, increase her/his productivity and incomes at work, and facilitate everybody’s participation in economic and social life. It follows that education and training can also help individuals to escape poverty by providing them with the skills and knowledge to raise their output and generate income. Investing in education and training is, therefore, an investment in the future; knowledge and skills is the engine of economic growth and social development (UNESCO/ILO, 2002).

A competitive global market economy requires technical and professional citizens trained in broad and specific occupation . Hence , Technical Vocational Education and Training (TVET) may seen as a center for the development of marketable and entrepreneurial skills and a means for development .It is with such consideration that Ethiopia put in place a comprehensive Human Resource Development Program aimed at strengthening resources development through TVET (MOE,2005 ).

To meet this demand, technical and vocational education and training have been diversified, enrolment has gone up and the trainees are prepared to perform functions valued by the market and society. The flexibility of TVET delivery also allows for a strengthening and further development and deepening of cooperative TVET (including apprenticeship training The major advantage of apprenticeship training and more generally cooperative TVET delivery forms) is its vicinity to the world of work. Trainees are systematically exposed to the world of work and learn the occupational practice in a real life situation. Experience shows that this leads to significantly better training outcomes, practical skills, work attitudes and theoretical comprehension of the occupational requirements. Furthermore, enterprises get to know the trainees, which often lead to employment after graduation. Through cooperative TVET schemes companies can also contribute to further development of TVET system. Apprenticeships and other forms of cooperative training tend to be more cost effective than school-based TVET, as TVET institutions need not invest in sophisticated machinery and training periods in the institutions will be shorter (MOE ,2008 ).

At the moment, elements of cooperative TVET are included in the formal TVET programs in the form of workplace internships of several months. This represents an important step forward in making the TVET system more relevant. However, cooperative training should be deepened to fully utilize its advantages for the TVET system. To this end, maximum flexibility is given to TVET providers to negotiate and develop relationships with individual employers, groups of employers or business/sector associations about the organization of cooperative delivery schemes. TVET providers will also be encouraged to venture into more agreements with small companies and the micro enterprise sector as these companies represent the target labor market for a large group of trainees. As a rule, providers will have the freedom to develop cooperative TVET programs in accordance with specific needs and potentials of companies and trainees, as long as the training is oriented on the occupational standards and will enable trainees to achieve the necessary competences of a qualification or part of a qualification. The TVET executive bodies will explore possibilities to encourage large companies and micro and small enterprises to cooperate with TVET institutions and to introduce apprenticeships, e.g. through advertising, rewarding participating companies or financial (MOE, 2008 )

As it is described above, cooperative training is very important in order to produce globally competent, innovative and self employed man power in the country. Hence, assessing the opportunities and challenges of implementation of cooperative training has paramount importance for its successfulness.

1. 2. Statement of the problem

Cooperative training is used as an instrument for a private-public-partnership of employers and government . It is applied in their effort to make Ethiopian’s economy competitive in a globalized market, to reach out for a significant increase of TVET enrolment figures, and to have graduates who master the challenge of modern workplace. To make the enterprises and other business organizations cooperate with the TVET institutions, they have to be involved in planning, developing the objectives and strategies .

In Ethiopia, despite the due emphasis given to technical and vocational system by the government, the participation of enterprise in cooperative training programs is still very low. A study conducted by Wanna (1998) indicated that though there are some efforts by such TVET institutions as the Addis Ababa Technical School, Entoto Vocational , and General Wingate School to create links with enterprises, the status of other institution is not well documented .

Moreover, a research conducted by Addis Ababa city Administration TVET Agency ( 2013) , indicated that the industry participation in TVET system in Addis Ababa City Government is not adequate. It also identified that the awareness of industry sector about TVET system in general and cooperative training benefits in particular is found to be very low. Furthermore , it described the existence of poor follow -up and monitoring .

However, the research didn’t cover issues like the way cooperative training enterprises are selected and the opportunities in implementing cooperative training. The extent to which enterprises and TVET colleges discharge their responsibilities in implementing cooperative training is also an issue that has not been raised. In addition, issues like the extent to which practical training is delivered to trainees while conducting cooperative training and the challenges in implementation of cooperative training were not considered. Hence, this research tried to fill this gap. Thus, the research tried to addresses the following basic Questions:

1.3 .Basic questions

1. How are the cooperative training enterprises selected?
2. What are the opportunities in implementation of cooperative training?
3. To what extent enterprises and TVET colleges discharge their responsibilities in implementing cooperative training?
4. To what extent practical training activities are provided to trainees while conducting cooperative training?
5. What are the challenges of implementation of cooperative training?

1.4 objective of the study

1.4.1 General objective

The general objective of this study is to assess the opportunities and challenges of implementation of cooperative training in selected three public TVET Colleges of Addis Ababa city Administration.

1.4.2 Specific Objectives

The Specific Objectives include:

1. To identify the criteria used to select cooperative training enterprises;
2. To investigate the opportunities in implementation of cooperative training;
3. To examine whether enterprises and TVET colleges discharge their responsibilities in implementing cooperative training;
4. To indicate the level of practical training delivered to trainees while conducting cooperative training;
5. To identify the challenges in implementing cooperative training
6. To make recommendations which help to curb the existing challenges in implementing cooperative training.

1.5. Significance of the study

Cooperative training is now becoming a hot issue in Ethiopia. Increasing the skills of workers through more education and vocational training has been given great attention in the Ethiopian Educational system. Similarly, the rapidly changing economy and civil service requires well skilled work force and well educated society that can respond properly to various development endeavors of the country. Hence, successful implementation of cooperative training program helps to satisfy globally competent, skilled, and innovative manpower need of the country . For this reasons, assessing the opportunities and challenges of implementation of cooperative training may have the following importance.

1. It may give feedback to the colleges in order to evaluate and improve the quality as well as accessibility of cooperative training in the area.
2. It may give chance to colleges to share experiences and learn from each other.
3. It may create awareness to stakeholders that cooperative trainings are advantageous to them as they can employ young workers who are familiar to their enterprise so that they contribute in reducing youth unemployment in the country.
4. It may also provide information to researchers and curriculum planners to undertake further investigation on the opportunities and challenges of implementation of cooperative training in the city Administration and National level.

1.6. Delimitations and Scope of the Study

Taking time and financial constraints in to account, this study was delimited to Regular programs of three Government TVET Colleges in Addis Ababa City Administration and their respective three enterprises that take part on cooperative training. In the selection of the institution, accessibility ofTVET with cooperative training enterprises and Joint plan ofTVET institutions with enterprises was taken in to considerations. Regarding the focus of the study it was limited to the opportunities and challenges of implementing cooperative training.

1.7. Limitations of the Study

There were certain constraints that challenged the study. The serious challenge that researcher faced was some of the respondents were not willing to fill the provided questionnaires due to being attached with their regular works and carelessness. But the researcher has tried to convince them by telling the importance of the study and discussing with their respective department heads. Since cooperative training mode of training delivery is a recent experience in Ethiopian TVET program, there was few access to empirical evidence or locally produced documents related to the problem raised in the study. As a result, it was to some extent restricted to use guideline, framework, report and strategy documents as part of a review literature.

1.8. Definition of Terms

Cooperative Training— Mode of TVET provided in partnership between enterprises and TVET institutions.

A training plan— Is a plan designed by the TVET institution in partnership with the cooperating partner establishment.

A TVET guidance & counselors /Vocational Counselor— a school-based staff member, who monitors, assists and coordinates enterprise training and ensures that the institution based competencies are learned in accordance with the training plan.

A Memorandum of Agreement (MoA) (Memorandum of understanding) -- The partner establishment, which spells out the terms and conditions of the training partnership. A memorandum of Understanding is a major reference document showing every roles and responsibilities of partners in cooperative training.

Industry Trainer-- Any qualified enterprise staff member participating in cooperative training may act as a trainer for trainees.

1.9. Organization of the study

This study has five chapters. The first chapter; deals with introduction, statement of the problem significance of the study delimitation of the study ,limitation of the study and definition of operational terms in the study. The second chapter addresses the review of related literature to the topic of the study. The third chapter deals with the research design and methodology, sources of data, population and sampling technique, and tools of data collection. In chapter four, data presentation, analysis and interpretation have been presented. And chapter five contains the summary of the findings, conclusions and recommendations. In addition to these, references, sample questionnaires, questions of interviews and other relevant documents are attached to the Last part of the thesis.

CHAPTER TWO

2. REVIEW OF RELATED LITRATURE

2.1 Concept of Cooperative Training

According to Reeve (2004), the concept of cooperative training began in the United Kingdom in the late 1800s, in USA in 1906 and Canada in 1957. He points out that cooperative training is now practiced in more than 60 countries around the world, and that it operates on most continents in associations similar to those like the Southern African Society for Cooperative Education (SASCE) .Further, the practice of cooperative education (training) can be traced back to 1903 in Northern England, where a sandwich education program was introduced at Sunderland Technical College. Other terms used in relation to cooperative training include professional practice, apprenticeship, articles, candidature, coop, field-based learning,

Internships or interns, project based learning and school to work (Groenewald,2004).

According to CAFCE-Canadian Association for Cooperative Education (2005), Cooperative Education is an education program that integrates the academic studies of a student with the experience in work market through the programs of curricular periods of training in companies. The program consists in alternating periods of experience in business- oriented appropriate fields, industries, governmental institutions, of social services and companies, in compliance with the following criteria:

- Each training program is developed and/or approved by the cooperative educational institution in compliance with its pedagogical project
- The student of the cooperative course receives remuneration for its played work instead ofbeing a mere observer.
- The student of the Cooperative course receives remuneration for its played work.
- The institution of cooperative education monitors the progress of the student in the work.
- The performance of the trainee in the work is supervised and evaluated by the company, who receives the student from the Cooperative course.
- The time of experience of work in companies will have to be of , at least ,50 % of that one destined to the academic activities in the school.

Cooperative education is an educational philosophy that advocates the formal integration of work experience (or community service) into the theoretical curriculum (Pratt,1996). Cates and Jones (1999) define cooperative education as a structured educational strategy that progressively integrates academic study with learning through productive work experiences in a field related to a student’s academic or career goals. This experiential learning is not an add-on to the curriculum, but an integral part of the educational process.

Stull and Vinsonhaler (1996) suggest a fresh perspective and definition of cooperative education as a curriculum model, affirming work-based learning and based on sound adult learning theories and principles such as self directed learning , reflective learning /practice and transformative learning . Duwart and Canele (1997) recommend a three phase educational process, i.e .preparation, experience and reflection. However, finn (1997) suggests it is necessary to go beyond re conceiving to adopting cooperative education as educational strategy.

MoE (2008), stated that the major advantage of apprenticeship training (and more generally cooperative TVET delivery) is its vicinity to the world of work. Trainees are systematically exposed to the world of work and learn the occupational practice in a real life situation. Experience shows that this leads to significantly better training outcomes, practical skills, work attitudes and theoretical comprehension of the occupational requirements. Furthermore, enterprises get to know the trainees, which often lead to employment after graduation. Through cooperative TVET schemes companies can also contribute to the further development of TVET system. Finally, apprenticeships and other forms of cooperative training tend to be more cost effective than school-based TVET, as TVET institutions need not invest in sophisticated machinery and training periods in the institutions will be shorter.

According to Ecbp (2007), as cited by Addis Ababa city administration TVET agency (2013), the concept of cooperative training involves the process of any kind of training provided in partnership between enterprises and Technical and Vocational Education and Training (TVET) institutions. Further, it stated cooperative training is a systematic training provided at a specific workplace in the work process/work shop at an enterprises and a TVET institution. It is a training approach directed toward the attainment of a skilled and versatile work force adaptable to a changing technology to meet industry’s current and future manpower needs and toward providing workers with the industrial skills necessary for gainful employment.

2.2 TVET Objectives on Cooperative Training

According to Cates and Jones (1999), the cooperative training aims to tie theory and practice together directly. The student completes all the courses necessary to obtain the diploma and he/she also finishes his apprenticeship course in the practical field .This apprenticeship course in practical work is arranged by the college, and is just as carefully worked out as his college curriculum .The theoretical work in the college and the practical work in the commercial field are coordinated by a number of devices, but principally by use of teachers whom we call coordinators. The theory and practice are made hand in hand so that the practical work has the highest possible educational value. The practical work is just as carefully as the college curriculum. Every detail of the practical course is carefully arranged and practice and theory are knit together in a union scheme through a carefully devised system of coordination. The function of this coordination department is to see that an intimate tie is established between the theory and practice and to check and counter check this tie. In this way the outside practical work is made of great educational value.

The original goal of cooperative education was to enhance student learning. Sovila (2004) remarked that the leaders of many institutions do not seem to appreciate the mission of cooperative education or else choose to ignore it. The coordinating and administrative support service must be an integral part of the academic program that aids the achievement of the curriculum outcomes. However, Kerka (1999) cautions that too much emphases is placed on job placements instead of learning and calls for a redesign and/or re conceptualization of cooperative education (i.e . learning from work experience integrated into the curriculum).

According to Greoewald (2004) , the original aims of cooperative training is to enhance trainees learning. The purpose and role of cooperative education (training) can be regarded as multifaceted when the complexity and the various role -players are considered. It must be remembered that from the trainee’s point of view career clarification is the most important (Coll & Eames, 2004).

As it is stated in Ecbp (2007) , the objectives of cooperative training is to educate and train effectively and cost-efficiently a workforce which possesses the competencies needed on the labor-market; to encourage enterprises-large as well as small and micro-enterprises in the formal as well as the informal economy-to participate in the training process voluntarily and regularly in their own interest, to gain a qualified workforce at their own expense; to motivate participating enterprises to assign experienced trainers to plan and supervise training in order to maintain and increase their competitiveness and performance in an ever changing market; to improve young people’s access to cooperative training and to nationally recognized certificates and hence to create opportunities for further education and training, particularly for disadvantaged groups; and to orient trainees regarding the importance of work attitudes and ethics, e.g. the effectiveness and the style of work and how to deal with colleagues and clients. This issue is crucial for the trainees’ future employability, and it is best to be learned in the enterprises themselves; to bring stakeholders together to work on the provision of suitably qualified manpower as indicated in the ESDP III (2005) . Chambers and professional associations, other ministries involved in TVET, industrial and service-providing enterprises which want to play a role in cooperative training, public and private training providers and other stakeholders.

2.3 Basic Standards /Guidelines and Cooperative Training Agreement Documents 2.3.1 Guideline document

As it is indicated in MoE (2007), documents used for the purpose of agreement between cooperative training providing companies and TVET institutions as well as guidelines are designed for the use of enterprises, private and public TVET colleges/institutions, and non­government organizations (NGO’s) to create awareness and help the partners to have common understanding about cooperative training and encourage all to participate and benefit from it, Further, it stated that the guideline document provides potential participants with information about cooperative training covering its procedures, the roles played by each partner, the potential benefits, and how it is monitored and evaluated. With this information, participants can assess their capacity and suitability for engagement in cooperative training.

2.3.2 Memorandum of agreement between TVET institutions and Enterprises

MoE (2007), stated that the cooperating partners (enterprise/TVET institution) in the cooperative training should establish a Memorandum of Agreement to identify the occupations in which they want to cooperate which includes the nature and objective of the cooperative training program; occupational area and activity for which cooperative training is to be provided; the commencement and the duration of cooperative training; right and obligations of the parties; duration in hours , status of trainees; conditions for MoA termination; and performance monitoring and evaluation system. A Memorandum of Agreement (MoA) or its equivalent, entered into by the TVET-institution and the partner establishment, which spells out the terms and conditions of the training partnership.

2.3.3 The training contract document between Enterprise and trainee

MoE (2007) , stated that Enterprises participating in cooperative training will complete a training contract with each trainee. The training contract document should at least specify name of cooperating parties; the training plan, timetable and purpose of the cooperative training, and in particular the form of occupational activity for which cooperative training is to be provided; the commencement and the duration of cooperative training; any cooperative training measures taking place outside the training premises; the length of the normal daily hours of cooperative training; the length of probationary period; the payment of an allowance if any; and the conditions under which the cooperative training contract may be terminated Further indicated, the document should be signed by enterprises, the trainees and the trainees’ statutory representative. An enterprise should provide the trainees and their statutory representatives with a copy of the signed document.

2.4. Who is Involved in Cooperative Training?

Any enterprise which can provide a working place to trainees and can also assign a training coordinator/supervisor, who has successfully passed the relevant occupational assessment, can be a cooperative training partner. The occupational activities of the enterprises must be in line with the occupational training, regardless ofhow large or small the company is ( MOE, 2010).

2.5. Monitoring the Training Progress

Cooperative education /training is structured educational strategies that integrate classroom- based learning with practical work experience through productive work experience through productive work placements in fields related to trainees academic or career goals. These experiences -based programs capitalize on the partnerships among trainees, educational institutions and employers/ enterprises, with specified responsibilities for each party. Monitoring has been described as an intense interpersonal exchange between a senior experienced colleague (mentor) and a less experiencedjunior colleague (protégé) in which the mentor provides support, direction, and feedback regarding career plans and personal development (Russell &Adams 1991). This interpersonal exchange between the mentor and the protégé may involve counseling, psychological support, protection, promotion, sponsorship, skill-development, and involvement in professional organizations (Cargill, 1989) .

MOE (2010), stated that Monitoring student and enterprise records will be necessary to determine training progress. This should be a balance between periodic formal performance reviews by the vocational counselor/ TVET teacher and informal daily observations and feedback from the enterprise trainer. Assessment of trainees during the training program is held in enterprises and TVET institutions by the enterprise trainer and TVET teacher

2.6. Inspecting Cooperative Training Site

As it is described in MOE (2010), based on the agreement cited in the Memorandum of understanding (MoU), responsible bodies from TVET institutions have to make a regular visit to the sites. The main purpose of this visit is to make sure that all practical training activities are provided regarding the signed MoU. If the outcome of the observation is lower than expected, a meeting attended by all the involved parties (company, student and TVET institution) has to be scheduled immediately to sort out the weaknesses and make sure the ongoing training is fruitful. Otherwise the cooperative training (CT) activities have to be canceled and the company can no longer be a cooperative training partner.

2.7 Responsibilities of participating parties in cooperative Training program

An enterprise may assign one of its trainers to be a training coordinator for the enterprise. The training coordinator may assign more than one trainer to instruct the trainee while s/he rotates among the various workstations. In turn, one trainer may work with more than one trainee in an enterprise. Enterprise based training coordinator’s responsibilities are collaborate with the staff of the TVET institutions to develop and validate the training plan, which specifies , among others, the training stations; facilitate the signings of a Memorandum of agreement by the two partners and training contract among trainees; recommend the assignment of enterprise trainer/s; coordinate implementation of the training plan with all departments concerned ; monitor and evaluate trainees’ performance; recommend to management disciplinary actions for trainees’ where needed; assesses the proficiency level by gained by trainees during the enterprise training ; and ; and maintain regular communication with the vocational counselor/ trainer for feedback and information updates.

Responsibilities of Enterprise-based training coordinators

An enterprise may assign one of its trainers to be a training coordinator for the enterprise. The training coordinator may assign more than one trainer to instruct the trainee while s/he rotates among the various workstations. In turn, one trainer may work with more than one trainee in an enterprise. Enterprise-based training coordinator’s responsibilities are collaborate with the staff of the TVET institutions to develop and validate the training plan, which specifies, among others, the training stations; facilitate the signing of a Memorandum of agreement by the two partners and training contract among trainees; recommend the assignment of enterprise trainer/s; coordinate implementation of the training plan with all departments concerned; monitor and evaluate trainees’ performance; recommend to management disciplinary actions for trainees’ where needed; assesses the proficiency level gained by trainees during the enterprise training; and maintain regular communication with the Vocational Counselor/trainer for feedback and information updates.

Responsibilities of Industry trainer

According to MoE, (2007) , Industry/enterprise trainer is responsible for developing a training plan that ensures the trainee has an opportunity to learn all the required work-based skills during the course of the program; evaluating the trainee’s progress on a regular basis and completing the trainee checklist documenting achievement of the required skills; helping the trainee avoid problems and errors on work assignments; providing emotional support, encouragement, direction, and knowledge about the workplace culture; seeking help from appropriate sources if personal problems are affecting the trainee’s performance; arranging meetings with the trainee’s parents or guardians and school personnel during the school year to discuss the trainee’s progress; communicating regularly with the vocational counselor, the training coordinator and/or the TVET trainer of the related class to discuss any problems and ensure that work-based learning experiences and classroom instruction are integrated as much as possible; skilled in the area in which the trainees will be trained in the enterprise; good communication skills in the workplace; and knowledge of and commitment to the principles of training and the training program.

Responsibilities of TVET Training coordinator/ Vocational counselor

The TVET guidance & counselors /Vocational Counselor’s /training coordinator’sjob in a TVET institution is to work with enterprise- based training coordinators and enterprise trainers in partner enterprises to implement the cooperative training program. The followings are some of TVET training coordinator’s responsibilities (MoE, 2007), promotes and markets cooperative training with establishments; recruits new trainees in cooperation with the partner enterprises, if demanded by the enterprise; facilitates the development and validation of training plan by the major partners; set up the schedules of the classes, synchronized with the training plan; facilitates the signing of the Memorandum of Agreement; places the trainees in the cooperating partner enterprises; visits the partner enterprises to monitor and evaluate the performance of trainees and receives feedback from the training coordinator; and monitors the trainees’ performance by conducting regular visits to the partner establishment, checking the trainees’ record books weekly, obtaining feedback directly from the trainees and counseling trainees on training related matters.

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Details

Title
Assessment of the opportunities and challenges in the implementation of cooperative Training. The case of selected public Technical and Vocational Education and Training Colleges in Addis Ababa City Government
College
Addis Ababa University  (College of Education and behavioural studies)
Course
Vocational Management
Author
Year
2014
Pages
86
Catalog Number
V293612
ISBN (eBook)
9783656912286
ISBN (Book)
9783656912293
File size
775 KB
Language
English
Tags
assessment, training, technical, vocational, education, colleges, addis, ababa, city, government
Quote paper
Mulugeta Taye (Author), 2014, Assessment of the opportunities and challenges in the implementation of cooperative Training. The case of selected public Technical and Vocational Education and Training Colleges in Addis Ababa City Government, Munich, GRIN Verlag, https://www.grin.com/document/293612

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