Canadian Immigration Policy. Opportunities and steps to get a permanent visa


Seminar Paper, 2015
21 Pages, Grade: 13

Excerpt

Table of Contents

Introduction

1 Programs
1.1 Mandatory Requirements
1.2 Express Entry
1.2.1 National Occupational Classification
1.2.2 Federal Skilled Worker Program
1.2.3 Federal Skilled Trades Class
1.2.4 Canadian Experience Class
1.2.5 Provincial Nominee Program
1.3 Start-Up Visa
1.4 Self-Employed
1.5 Investor Program
1.6 Family Class

2 Permanent Resident Card
2.1 Requirements
2.2 Application
2.3 Rights and Responsibilities
2.4 Permanent Resident Status

3 Citizenship
3.1 Requirements
3.2 Application
3.3 Rights and Responsibilities
3.4 Citizenship Ceremony
3.5 Proof of Citizenship

Bibliography

Appendix

Introduction

This work concentrates on the different opportunities and steps how to get a permanent visa in Canada and even become a Canadian citizen. It refers to the English speaking territories and provinces only, since the province of Quebec is allowed to have their own immigration programs.

1 Programs

Thinking about immigrating to Canada, one should know that there are different categories you can apply for based on your plans and reasons why you want to go to Canada. The province of Quebec has it’s own immigration policy.[1] If you are not sure which program you should apply for you can use an online testing tool on the Canadian Immigration website[2]. You have to answer questions about your work experience, education and why you want to go to Canada. After completing the test you will get your results which tell you the immigration programs you are allowed to apply for.[3]

1.1 Mandatory Requirements

There are three things you need for every immigration program. Your police certificates, your medical exams and the Right of Permanent Residence Fee.

Any family member aged 18 or older must provide a police certificate when they want to apply for an immigration program. This document shows if you pose a threat to Canadians and whether you are admissible[4] in Canada.

Additionally, you have to submit a medical exam when applying for permanent residence to determine whether you are a health risk or would cost the heath-care system too much. Only CIC authorized doctors are allowed to issue this certificate and you can find a list of them on CIC’s official website.

Furthermore, applicants always have to pay the Right of Permanent Residence Fee. It is $490 CAD for each person and is for your permanent residence visa.[5]

1.2 Express Entry

In January 2015, the Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) introduced a new system called Express Entry. It changes the way people with skilled work experience apply to immigrate to Canada. You have to use this system if you want to apply for the Federal Skilled Worker Program, the Federal Skilled Trades Program, the Canadian Experience Class and the Provincial Nominee Program.[6]

If you plan on applying for one of those immigration programs you have to complete an online Express Entry profile. You have to answer questions about your skills, work experience, language ability, education and other details that may help you in Canada. You will be accepted into a pool of candidates if you meet the criteria for the federal immigration program you applied for. Anyone without a job offer supported by a Labour Market Impact Assessment (LMIA), or a nomination from a Canadian province or territory must register with Canada’s Job Bank. “Candidates will be ranked against others in the pool using a point-based system called Comprehensive Ranking System[7]. Points are awarded using the information in their profile.” Only candidates with the highest scores will be invited to apply for immigration. Points are given for a job offer, a nomination from a Canadian province or territory and skills and experience factors. Getting an invitation to apply for permanent residence, you have 60 days to download the application package for your immigration program from CIC’s official website and to submit it.[8]

1.2.1 National Occupational Classification

The National Occupational Classification, short NOC, is a system to classify jobs. The Government of Canada uses this system to determinate whether a job or work experience meets the criteria for a specific immigration program. “Jobs are grouped based on the type of work a person does and the type of job duties.” There are five different Skill Types and Levels. Under Skill Type 0 are management jobs, Skill Level A are professional jobs you usually need university degree for, Skill Level B are technical jobs and skilled trades. Under Skill Level C and D are intermediate and labour jobs. Applying as a skilled immigrant the work you did must be skill type 0, Level A or B. If your job is classified as Level C or D you may be able to apply for the Provincial Nominee Program or a temporary work visa. There is a list of all supported jobs on the CIC website where applicants can find out which Skill Type or Level their job is.[9]

1.2.2 Federal Skilled Worker Program

Immigrating to Canada as a federal skilled worker has been the most used method to enter the country. According to the growing number of applicants the government of Canada is constantly modifying the requirements of the FSW program in order to improve a newcomer’s chances to settle and build a new life in Canada.[10]

The immigration as a skilled worker is a points-based immigration. You will be assessed on a points system according to the so called “six selection factors”. These include education, age, work experience, language ability, adaptability and arranged employment in Canada. You can score up to 100 points[11] but you must have a minimum of 67 points to be able to apply. “If you plan to immigrate with your spouse or common-law partner, you should both calculate your score, and choose the one with the highest score to be the principal applicant.” This applies to most of the other immigration programs, too.[12]

In order to be able to apply for the FSW program you must meet the minimum requirements. You must have worked at least one year within the last ten years continuous in a full-time job (a total of 1,560 hours / 30 hours per week) or an equal amount in part-time. The work you did must have been paid, that means volunteer work and internships do not count. Your job has to be at Skill Type 0 or Skill Level A or B according to the 2011 NOC.

The minimum language level is CLB 7 (Canadian Language Benchmark) and you have to take part in a CIC approved language test that shows you meet the requirements in reading, speaking, listening and writing[13]. Moreover, your test results must not be older than two years on the day you apply for permanent residence and you have to include your test results to your Express Entry profile.

An applicant must have at least a Canadian secondary (high-school) or post-secondary certificate, diploma or degree or an ECA (Educational Credential Assessment) report issued by a CIC approved agency. “The report must show your foreign education is equal to a completed Canadian secondary or post-secondary certificate, diploma or degree.“

Additionally, you have to show that you have enough money to look after yourself and your family after you have arrived in Canada, unless you have a valid job offer provided by a Canadian employer and you are able to work in Canada legally. For example, a single person must have a minimum of $11,115 CAD to be able to apply for this program.[14]

Two other requirements one has to know are, you must intend not to live in the province of Quebec and you have to be admissible in Canada.[15] [16]

If you meet all the criteria, you are able to apply for permanent residence. There is a complete application package with all required forms downloadable on CIC’s official website. Before submitting the application the applicant should make sure that they paid their fees (550 CAD for an adult) and that they send it to the right address since there are different institutions in charge of every single immigration program (see appendix).[17]

1.2.3 Federal Skilled Trades Class

Canadian youth aspire to get a higher education rather than working in the trades. Due to Canada’s shortage of skilled trades workers Canada’s Minister of Immigration introduced a new immigration program called Federal Skilled Trades Class (FSTC), on January 2, 2013.[18]

For being able to apply for this program, one has to meet the minimum requirements. First of all, you have to intend to live outside the province of Quebec since they have their own immigration programs. Of course you have to be admissible in Canada to be ably to apply for permanent residence.[19]

Moreover, an applicant has to meet the required language levels in either French or English. They are CLB 5 for speaking and listening and CLB 4 for reading and writing. You also have to take part in a CIC approved language test[20] that shows you meet the requirements in these four categories. You must include your test results to your Express Entry profile and they must not be older than two years on the day you apply.

Additionally, one must have at least two years of full-time, or an equal amount of part-time, work experience within the five years before you apply. The job you did has to be a skilled trade and under one of the major and minor groups of the NOC Skill Level B[21].

Furthermore, you must have an offer of full-time employment (30 hours per week) provided by a Canadian employer for a total of at least one year or a ”certificate of qualification” in the skilled trade you worked or aspire to work in, issued by a Canadian province or territory. If you plan to apply for FSTC you have no education requirements but you can earn points for your Express Entry profile. “You either need a Canadian post-secondary certificate, diploma or degree, or a completed foreign credential and an Educational Credential Assessment (ECA) report from an agency approved by CIC.”[22]

“As with all the other immigration categories, the first step is to obtain an application package from the Citizenship and Immigration Canada (CIC) website and to complete the forms.” Make sure you paid your fees ($550 CAD for an adult) before applying and send your whole application with the receipt to CIC’s Centralized Intake Office (see appendix).[23]

1.2.4 Canadian Experience Class

The in September, 2008 introduced Canadian Experience Class (CEC) is since January 2015 part of the new Express Entry Program. The CEC is specializing in individuals who have studied or worked temporary in Canada and wish to immigrate permanently.[24]

If you have worked temporary in Canada before and want to apply for permanent residence now you must have gained at least one year of full-time work experience in a skilled job in Canada in the last three years before you apply for this program. The job one did must be at Skill Type 0, Level A or B according to the NOC. An applicant must have worked a minimum of 30 hours per week in either a full-time job or different part-time jobs, as long as it was paid work and at the NOC Skill Type 0, Level A or B. Additionally, you must have had a valid work permit for this period of time. Due to the fact that the province of Quebec has it’s own experience class program you must intend to live in another province or territory.[25]

[...]


[1] Citizenship and Immigration Canada. Skilled Immigrants (Express Entry). 21 June 2015 http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/skilled/index.asp

[2] http://onlineservices-servicesenligne.cic.gc.ca/eapp/eapp.do;jsessionid=CBD80E2C9B76C3EDDEEBD283BFFFD292 5 September 2015

[3] Citizenship and Immigration Canada. Do you want to come to Canada? 21 June 215

http://www.cic.gc.ca/ctc-vac/getting-started.asp

[4] Citizenship and Immigration Canada. Inadmissibility. 5 September 2015. http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/infORmation/inadmissibility/index.asp

[5] Naeem “Nick” Noorani, and Catherine A. Sas. Immigration to Canada: A practical Guide. International Self-Counsel Press Ltd., 2014, 24 – 28

[6] Naeem “Nick” Noorani, and Catherine A. Sas. 96-98

[7] Apical India Management Services Private Limited. Comprehensive Ranking System. 5 September 2015. http://www.immigrationxperts.com/comprehensive-ranking-system/

[8] Citizenship and Immigration Canada. Express Entry. 21 June 2015

http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/express-entry/index.asp

[9] Citizenship and Immigration Canada. Find your NOC. 17 July 2015 http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/skilled/noc.asp

[10] Naeem “Nick” Noorani, and Catherine A. Sas, 37-38

[11] Canadian Citizenship and Immigration Resource Center. Who Qualifies for Canadian Permanent Residence/Skilled Worker Immigration? 5 September 2015. http://www.immigration.ca/index.php/en/who-qualifies-for-canadian-immigration-under-the-skilled-worker-program

[12] workpermit.com. Canada Skilled Worker Immigration – points based immigration. 24 August 2015 http://www.workpermit.com/canada/individual/skilled.htm

[13] Center for Canadian Language Benchmarks. English as a second language for adults. 5 September 2015 http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/pdf/pub/language-benchmarks.pdf

[14] Naeem “Nick” Noorani and Catherine A. Sas, Immigrate to Canada: A practical Guide. International Self-Counsel Press Ltd., 2014, 46

[15] Citizenship and Immigration Canada. Inadmissibility. 5 September 2015. http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/infORmation/inadmissibility/index.asp

[16] Citizenship and Immigration Canada. Determine your eligibility – federal skilled workers. 21 June 2015 http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/skilled/apply-who.asp

[17] Naeem “Nick” Noorani, and Catherine A. Sas, 47-48

[18] Naeem “Nick” Noorani, and Catherine A. Sas, 91

[19] Citizenship and Immigration Canada. Inadmissibility. 5 September 2015. http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/infORmation/inadmissibility/index.asp

[20] Center for Canadian Language Benchmarks. English as a second language for adults. 5 September 2015 http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/pdf/pub/language-benchmarks.pdf

[21] Citizenship Immigration Canada. Determine your eligibility – federal skilled trades. 21. June 2015 http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/trades/apply-who.asp

[22] Citizenship Immigration Canada. Determine your eligibility – federal skilled trades. 21. June 2015 http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/trades/apply-who.asp

[23] Naeem “Nick” Noorani, and Catherine A. Sas, 94 – 95

[24] Canadian Citizenship and Immigration Resource Center. The Canada Experience Class. 17 July 2015 http://www.immigration.ca/en/the-canada-experience-class.html

[25] Citizenship and Immigration Canada. Determine your eligibility – Canadian Experience Class. 21 June 2015 http://www.cic.gc.ca/english/immigrate/cec/apply-who.asp

Excerpt out of 21 pages

Details

Title
Canadian Immigration Policy. Opportunities and steps to get a permanent visa
Grade
13
Author
Year
2015
Pages
21
Catalog Number
V314568
ISBN (eBook)
9783668136359
ISBN (Book)
9783668136366
File size
618 KB
Language
English
Tags
Canada, Immigration, Policy, English
Quote paper
Daniel Eisen (Author), 2015, Canadian Immigration Policy. Opportunities and steps to get a permanent visa, Munich, GRIN Verlag, https://www.grin.com/document/314568

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