A Novel Tool for Monitoring of Forest Plant Growth and Development Stages. Complexation of Spectroscopy, Gas Chromatography and Direct Mass Spectrometry


Literature Review, 2014
106 Pages

Free online reading

A NOVEL TOOL FOR MONITORING OF FOREST PLANT GROWTH AND DEVELOPMENT STAGES : COMPLEXATION OF SPECTROSCOPY, GAS CHROMATOGRAPHY AND DIRECT MASS SPECTROMETRY

Die uns vertrauten grünen Gewa chse zeigen im allgemeinen dem flüchtigen Blicke so wenig Beweglichkeit, dak man schon genauer hinsehen muk , um sich von ihrem Vorhandense in zu überzeugen. Still und gerauschlos geht da alles vor sich, ohne Larm, ohne Zappeln, Hasten und Fliehen. Aber man nehme sich nur die Zeit in warmen Frühlingstagen etwa eine Rokkastanie zu beobachten, wie sie ihre Knospen, entfaltet. Welch eine Fülle von Veranderungen, die da in kurzer Zeit sich folgen!

E.G. Pringsheim "Das pflanzliche Bewegungsvermögen" (Die Reizbewegungen der Pflanzen),

1912.

ABSTRACT

A novel hybrid method for direct auxanometric measurements is proposed, which allows to analyze plant growth dynamics at different developmental stages. The above measurements include long-term monitoring using optical analysis with direct mass spectroscopic and gas chromatographic detection. Based on the known flavor differences оf blooming plants at various phenological stages, we propose to distinguish between phenological stage dynamics of various plant species and groups according to modern trends in flavor chemistry. It is possible to perform a simultaneous chemical analysis and automatic classification of forest plants in model plant communities according to their phenorhythm types and phenological groups with the approach described using automatic pattern recognition and MS fingerprinting. The novel method can also provide phenospectral data ranging useful for establishing the dependence of plant growth and developmental stage phenology on the environmental factors. Since the method is based on combination of several different measurement sources, it is standardless, and thus possesses a wide application in laboratory climatic chambers as well as in natural field conditions with the equipment placed in Stevenson screen (meteorological instrument shelter) like the abundant tools for meteo-climatic monitoring.

INTRODUCTION

As is known, auxanometry is a classic and standard principle for measuring the growth of tree seedlings. Various auxanometers or their auto-recording variants, auxanographs1, are used for this purpose. The simplest auxanometers were designed in the late 19th century (Barnes 18 87 , Bumpus 1887, Stone 1892, Golden 1894) and for the first time improved in the first quarter of the 20th century (Lloyd 1903, Bovie 1912, 1915). The newest designs for that time already offered micrometer-scale resolution and were appropriate for correlation measurements of growth characteristics depending on the changes in the composition of atmosphere. Since that time (1884), the Österreichische botanische Zeitschrift has repeatedly published reports that mentioned use of the like devices at different institutions or in various publications (Burgerstein 1884, Fritsch 1905, Nestler 1909). For example, see full "Liter atur- Übe rsicht" in "Österreichische botanische

Zeitschrift", 1907. In particular, the second volume of The Physiology of Plants, the classic treatise by Pfeffer, published in 1903 (Fig. 1a), gives the description of a chronographic auxanom- eter, a high-tech device by the standards of the early 20th century. This construct2, equipped with a self-recoding unit and a dial, remained almost unchanged until the 1950s, when the trend of automating laboratory equipment emerged in Europe and the USA.

However, this trend entered the Soviet practice much later. For comparison, one can see an example of auxanometer from the corresponding entry of the Great Soviet Encyclopedia, released by Macmillan Publishers since 1974 (Fig. 1b). Evidently, its design is almost the same or even more simple as compared with the device by Pfeffer. However, the very same design was reproduced in an unchanged form in the MsydAp Еоріетікр ЕукикАопаібеіа, since the auxanometers used in the Soviet Union until the last quarter of the 20th century did not actually differ from the foreign prototypes of the beginning of the century. As early as the late 19th century, such devices supplied to Russia or designed there by analogy were equipped with metric dials or scales (see Fig. 1c for an example of such a device with a l owe r di al s cal e , borro we d from vol . 1 of t he Bro ckhaus and Efron Encyclopedic Dictionary3, 1890).

Later, most of the auxanometers described in Russian/Soviet papers yielded to the outdated foreign devices in the degree of mechanization and precision (Bovie 1912, 1915). Moreover, these devices all too often were just modified routine auxanometers rather than auxanographs as the gadgets of this kind (as in Fig. 1c) were defined. Several early micrometer-scale auxanom- eters were fit with a microscope placed in a horizontal position; however, this was metrologically unreasonable relative to simplified variants. This is because the accuracy in graphical records of the growth dynamics measured with an arc or a recording chart of a drum via an auxa- nometer needle, similar to a three-arm lever (Engelmann's), still frequently used in kymographs, widespread in the post-Soviet practice, was far from comparable with the accuracy of micrometer-scale measurements.

However, many Russian and Soviet researchers of that time proposed modifications of auxanom- eters and designed auxanometry devices based on alternative principles. In particular, V.V. Lepeshkin, a Russian emigrant, described in the 1920s the applicability of auxanometry to Thallo- phytes in his monograph Lehrbuch der Pflanzen- physiologie auf Physikalisch-Chemischer Grundlage (Lepeschkin 1925) . At the same time, N.G. Cholodny, a Soviet biologist and a founder of the theory of phytohormonal nature of tropisms, designed an auxanometer able to analyze the role of water (that is, the role of turgor, guttation, and transpiration) in the growth and tropisms of higher plants, which he named a micropotometer ( Chol o dny 1 9 2 9 ) ( t hi s de vi ce was a ke y t oo l i n his major experiments clarifying the effects of plant hormones on tropisms). Later, Went, the second contributor to the phytohormonal theory of tropisms, currently known as the Went-Cholodny theory, also took advantage of auxanometry in his later paper of 1933 (Went 1933).

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

Fig. 1 a

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

Fig. 1 b

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

Fig. 1 c

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

Fig. 1 d

Note that the design of hydrometric auxanom- eters has been repeatedly used in irrigation forestry and applied botanical research (Engel & Heimann 1949, Sparks 1958, Kunkel & Gardner 1965, Meyer & Green 1981) for assessing hydra tion/dehydration and guttation of vegetation forms in wildlife; however, the references to the first paper by Cholodny with rare exceptions are absent. Occasionally, lysimeters were used in the studies of this kind as an environmental control in field auxanometry. Correspondingly, it was possible to speak about "correlation auxanometry", that is, about transition from detection of cytophysiological mechanisms underlying the growth of individual plant to large-scale ecological climatic and phenological monitoring under field conditions. However, this approach was too laborious for that time before the advent of computer networks for data collection and, correspondingly, was not adopted. Thus, the time scale of auxanometry measurements until the end of the 20th century was also rather limited allowing for monitoring of plant growth only rather than plant development and could not be applied to analyze periodization of plant development as well as phenological phases and growth stages in correlation with environmental conditions.

Meanwhile, a physiological and ecological trend in detecting the responses of growth to particular environmental conditions has been constantly taken into account in the studies involving auxanometry since the 1970s. This was associated with advanced capacities for measurements of this kind owing to available sensors and gauges for recoding physical and chemical parameters. In particular, Rayle and Cleland (Rayle & Cleland 1972) posed the question on (partial) substitution of the auxin functions by the action of hydrogen ions (pH) and carbon dioxide (similar to pH, the concentration of the latter characterizes the redox balance in geobiological systems). Jaffe (Jaffe 1973) analyzed mechanical response to a tribological impact on the seedling growth and the corresponding adaptive compensation; the discovered mechanism was named thigmomorphogene- sis.

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

Fig. 2 a

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

Fig. 2 b

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

Fig. 2 c

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

Fig. 2 d

McBride and Evans (McBride & Evans 1977) analyzed and compared direct impacts of acid solution and fusicoccin (a synthetic agent inducing cell plasma acidification by H+ hypersecretion, causing the so-called FC-induced elongation) . Further data favored the hypothesis postulating the influence of a hormone-induced pH modification near the cell wall on the growth kinetics (Evans et al . 1 98 0) . Then, these results were matched to the discovered function of electrogenic ion pumps (Katou & Ichino 1982); this suggested that bioelectrogenesis and plant growth and morphogenesis are cognate processes. Using quick motion recording (Mulkey et al. 1983) with time code, the state of a certain physiochemical parameter and each position in seedling growth or tropism were matched in a one-to-one manner. Thus, an integrated pattern of multiparametric growth kinetics for each tree species, variety, or cultivar could be constructed; however, the lack of the necessary hardware and software made it impossible.

In the 1990s, the auxanometers of outdated design were replaced with CCD camera-based (Christian & Lüthen 2000, Steffens & Lüthen 2000) electronic video digitizers with a high time resolution (Evans et al. 1994) and precision mech- anoelectrical devices with angular transducers (Claussen et al. 1 997) . The late 1 9 90s-early 2000s brought forth a most advanced technology- laser interference auxanometry (Budagovskaya & Guliaev 2002, Budagovskaya & Guliaev 2003) (a double laser optical system in auxanometry was for the first time used in 1 97 9 (Taiz & Métraux 1979) at various environmental pH and specific conductivity values, having an osmotic effect on cells) . As early as the 1 990s, the focus of the tools and systems intended for automated auxanometry shifted towards measuring the plant growth in correlation with environmental conditions (Fernandez & Wagner 1994, Inman-Bamber 1995). The new renaissance in auxanometry driven by computer-assisted image processing (Spalding & Miller 2013) provides one-to-one mapping of the zones responsive to different factors and the zones of different growth intensities in the presence of the corresponding factors, thus framing a new multimodal approach to analysis of growth data. In particular, this allows for multispectral colorimetric measurements of the plant surface, analysis of Fourier spectra of images for their anisotropy, mapping of absorbed radiation according to isophots, and construction of vector fields for plant growth dynamics using motion compensation technique involving mapping of gradients or pixel to ASCII data conversion. Thus, this new powerful tool can in part replace the biochemical principles, traditionally (1980s- 1990s) used for assessing the growth properties (Evans 1 984 , Mutaftschiev et al . 1 997 , Kim & Mulkey 1997), with "nondestructive testing", functional, and real-time in vivo and in situ monitoring techniques. However, digital imaging is unable to cover the entire critical range of biochemical analysis even if its dynamic and spectral ranges are extended to ultraviolet and infrared regions. This raises concern of conducting one-sided analysis and providing similarly one-sided interpretation of physiological and biochemical/biophysical data due to deficiency in the initial data sources.

Wandering from the subject, note that unimodality and the resulting poor representation were characteristic of the post-Soviet papers on new auxanometry methods. Despite that the first Russian works on electronic auxanometry date to the second half of the 2000s4 (Rassadina et al. 2007), these papers were still rather far from the European and North American works of the early 1990s. The so-called "upgrading" or "renovation" of previous generation devices (for example, a KTP auxanometer by the Laboratory of Experimental Botany with Novgorod University) is of no help, since this trick does not change the physical principles of measurement; frequently, the mere type of recoding is changed, whereas the design remains the same and no new sensors are a dde d. In t he s e Rus s i an s t udi e s , t he y di d no t even tried to simply combine time-lapse imaging principles with analysis of kinetics and signaling mechanisms or further involvement of molecular biological techniques (at that time, typical of this research area abroad (Binder 2007)). Actually, there was rather dubious difference between the auxanometers sufficient for laboratory training of university students or even schoolchildren interested in biology and analytical devices intended for serious research. Moreover, the bias towards simplifying research equipment was observed rather than designing new advanced tools based on high-precision analytical hardware and their promotion to universities, colleges, and schools.

In other words, as they wrote in the 1930s about Lilian J. Clarke, a founder of botany as an experimental science (Clarke 1935), this was "a time when science was still the Cinderella of the curriculum" (W.E.B. 1935). This situation demands a radical change. Otherwise, simplified models using insufficiently representative characteristic criteria will invade the papers utilizing auxanometry as verification reference (W.E.B., 1935).

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

a)

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

b)

Fig. 3: DESI-analysis and mass-spectrometric chemical dis- tinction of blooming flowers (photo taken from http://www.sciencedaily.com/ & http://news.sciencemag.org/)

DESCRIPTION OF THE NOVEL APPROACH

The facts described above demonstrate the need in development of a technology of auxanometry or, more precisely, a new ideology for this approach that would integrate physiological monitoring, analysis of most characteristic biochemical data of "nondestructive testing" (that is, not interfering with experiment by definition), and measurements of growth with the time resolution and duration sufficient for phenological periodization and analysis of stage pattern in plant development. Several aspects should be taken into account when coming up from analysis of growth (auxanometry) to the analysis of development. First, this is phenophases characteristic of individual species. On the scale of forest communities or their laboratory models in climate chambers simulating natural meteorological and climatic conditions, this requires construction of phenological spectra mutually correlated with biochemical spectroscopy/spectrometry data recorded with a time resolution matching the above mentioned integrated approach. This is evident, since the phenological spectrum, demonstrating according to Sukachev and Gams the transitions between phenological phases and the stages from vegetation through flowering eventually to leaf fall, unambiguously corresponds to physiological and biochemical changes in plants at these stages, which can be analyzed by the above men- tioned approach. Since phenological spectra are standard data for the forest management units of the CIS and post-Soviet Russia (where they are still retained), it is not a difficult task to integrate these data with geographic reference and geobotanical mapping.

Consider in more detail the potential of the proposed phenospectral auxanometry. As is known, the main plant phenophases are sap flow, leaf emergence, flowering, fruiting, and leaf fall. It is evident that (i) the sap flow is accompanied by changes in the transpiration rate and hydrodynamic coefficients of ascending and descending flows; (ii) leaf emergence is accompanied by photosynthetic oxygen emission and change in the transpiration rate caused by an increase in the specific functional surface; (iii) flowering is accompanied by emission of fragrance structures, characteristic from the standpoint of chemical analysis, which depend on the emission phase, that is, on sampling date; (iv) this emission parameter changes when passing to fruiting (although the first fragrance profiles may be recorded at the stage of leaf emergence); and (v) leaf fall is accompanied by emission of leaf decomposition products; and so on. All the products and adducts of physiological emission are chemically detectable by nondestructive (relative to the plant emitting them) assays (atmospheric

Consider in more detail the potential of the proposed phenospectral auxanometry. As is known, the main plant phenophases are sap flow, leaf emergence, flowering, fruiting, and leaf fall. It is evident that (i) the sap flow is accompanied by changes in the transpiration rate and hydrodynamic coefficients of ascending and descending flows; (ii) leaf emergence is accompanied by photosynthetic oxygen emission and change in the transpiration rate caused by an increase in the specific functional surface; (iii) flowering is accompanied by emission of fragrance structures, characteristic from the standpoint of chemical analysis, which depend on the emission phase, that is, on sampling date; (iv) this emission parameter changes when passing to fruiting (although the first fragrance profiles may be recorded at the stage of leaf emergence); and (v) leaf fall is accompanied by emission of leaf decomposition products; and so on. All the products and adducts of physiological emission are chemically detectable by nondestructive (relative to the plant emitting them) assays (atmospheric

Consider in more detail the potential of the proposed phenospectral auxanometry. As is known, the main plant phenophases are sap flow, leaf emergence, flowering, fruiting, and leaf fall. It is evident that (i) the sap flow is accompanied by changes in the transpiration rate and hydrodynamic coefficients of ascending and descending flows; (ii) leaf emergence is accompanied by photosynthetic oxygen emission and change in the transpiration rate caused by an increase in the specific functional surface; (iii) flowering is accompanied by emission of fragrance structures, characteristic from the standpoint of chemical analysis, which depend on the emission phase, that is, on sampling date; (iv) this emission parameter changes when passing to fruiting (although the first fragrance profiles may be recorded at the stage of leaf emergence); and (v) leaf fall is accompanied by emission of leaf decomposition products; and so on. All the products and adducts of physiological emission are chemically detectable by nondestructive (relative to the plant emitting them) assays (atmospheric spectral analysis and environmental gas chromatography).

Thus, what can be recoded by gas chromatography and can be interpreted as characteristic determinants for individual plant developmental stages in model plant communities?

First, evident analytes are gases. Physiological ecology of woody plants (Kozlowski 1990), a cooperative extension of the general physiology of woody plants (Kozlowski Pallardy 1996), suggests that oxygen emission is not the only chemical criterion for a plant community associated with gases, since the ecological feedbacks that determine physiology of the total emission should be taken into account. In particular, methane emissions from plants of various climatic zones have been recently discovered (Keppler F. et al. 2006). This induced studies of methanogenic activities of woody plants in many countries. In addition, plants have been shown to emit NO in amounts detectable by gas chromatography (GC) and gas chromatography–mass spectrometry (GC–MS) (Polessakaya 2007). Moreover, the soil–forest interactions should be considered when analyzing the gas emission: an increase in carbon dioxide concentration decreases the plant regulatory effect entailing increased emission of other greenhouse gases (nitrous oxide and methane) from the soil (Davidson et al. 2000, van Groenigen et al.

2011, Knohl & Veldkamp 2011); note that the climatic factors adverse to plants stimulate them to emit greenhouse gases (Qaderi & Reid 2009). Unlike some phytoplankton species (Iglesias- Rodriguez et al . 2008) , which increase their yield with carbon dioxide concentration, this is not true for forests. This emphasizes the importance of correctly detected feedbacks in physiological and ecological processes taking place in forest communities (in particular, the proposed phenospectral approach is applicable for this purpose).

Second, another important component is monitoring of transpiration. In part, this correlates with gas dynamic monitoring, since climate convection feedbacks, determining the phases of carbon dioxide content oscillation in the atmosphere, also regulate the air mass temperature, which influences evaporation/plant transpiration from the standpoint of leaf hydraulics (Beerling & Franks 2 0 1 0 , Brodri bb & Fe i l d 2 0 1 0 , McKown e t al . 2010) . The elemental composition of gases emitted by transpiration is assayed by chromatography for both the transpiration streams on the surface and root transpiration in a condensed medium (Monje & Bugbee 1996, Malone et al. 2002, Liao et al . 2006 , 2007) . The idealization when solving the corresponding model problem in vitro (under air-tight conditions) matches the sample phase and headspace (gas phase) in terms of gas chromatography, where the atmosphere or experimental medium of a climate chamber is regarded as a headspace and liquid transpiration surface, as a sample phase (by analogy to (Kolb & Et- tre 2006) ) . Thus, an air-tight climate chamber connected to channels of a gas chromatograph and its system for sampling volatile compounds may represent a time-resolved analog of the static headspace-gas chromatography assay in a native environment. Thus, transpiration and changes in the gas composition of standardized medium in a climate chamber can be concurrently monitored to deduce the main exchange processes between the plant biomass and simulated environment from the standpoint of physiological ecology of woody plants (Kozlowski 1990).

Third, gas chromatography5, including GC-MS and the mentioned headspace method, is applicable to analyze the odor volatiles emitted by woody plants and identify them according to the correspondingly databases (Jennings 1980, Heydanek & McGorrin 1981, Werkhoff et al. 1998). As is known, woody plants and the phytocommunities of forest layers emit characteristic odor volatiles in amounts sufficient for their organoleptic detection at flowering and fruiting stages. (For example, see Tucker A.O., DeBaggio, 2009, and also "Handbook of Fruit and Vegetable Flavors" (Ed. by Y. H. Hui, 2010) , "Flavor and Health Benefits of Small Fruits" (Ed. by M. Qian, A. Ri- mando, 2010)). In addition, trees frequently emit phytoncides (Li et al. 2006), routinely detect able by gas chromatography (Dmitriev et al. 1983). The emitted phytoncide activity is maximal during the light phase of photosynthesis and minimal during the dark phase. Note that the intensity of phytoncide generation correlates with respiration intensity, air temperature, and so on. Note also when applying the proposed method to forest practice that the highest effect of phytoncide activity is characteristic of forests rather than urban plantations (Li et al. 2008 a, b). It is possible to use rather large climatic chambers when assaying volatile organic compounds ( VOCs ) , s i nce t he phyt onci de s s pre ad t he i r act i on to 3-5 m (estimated according to inhibition of microorganisms). Current methods for odor analysis and bioprocessing (see, for example: "Flavor, Fragrance, and Odor Analysis" (Ed. by R. Marsili, 2011) and "Flavours and Fragrances: Chemistry, Bioprocessing and Sustainability" (Ed. by R.G. Berger, 2010)) are sensitive enough to detect fine compositions not only by definitions of dictionary entries (De Rovira 2004) , but also in a precise analytical6 sense thanks to the advance in automated odor quantification technologies (Wise et al. 2000).

In particular, electronic nose detection (Per- saud & Dodd 1982, Röck et al. 2008, Degenhardt et al. 2012, Jin et al . 2012), constantly improved and already used in several companies, makes it possible to do without the human perception in classification of odors determined by automated devices. The need in longitude time-resolved (phenological) odor analysis is explainable by that (i) microclimatic and phenological factors influence the chemical composition of emitted compounds (Lago et al. 2006); (ii) semiochemical characteristics of the plant signals to insect pollinators and of functionally opposite chemical repellents change with time (Schwarz et al . 2009); and (iii) palynological patterns of flowering seasons for individual plant species depend on climatic and geographic parameters determining phenology of a particular species or community; consequently, their odor characteristics change synchronously to or in a correlated manner with geographic zonal change in the flowering dates (Puc & Kasprzyk, in print). Thus, automated (not subjectively organoleptic but a correct chroma- t ography-bas e d fl avo r che mi s t ry a s s ay) anal ys i s of plant odor sources is absolutely necessary. Gas chromato-mass spectrometry (GC-MS) is frequently used for studying VOC emission from the leaf surface (Fredrickson et al. 2007); this suggests expanding mere gas chromatography detection7 by equipping a chromato-auxanometer device with a mass spectrometer, thereby transforming chromato-auxanometry into chromato-mass auxanome- try.

There is also a technique known as desorption electrospray ionization (DESI) which allows to perform blooming plant analysis and distinction according to direct mass-spectra, operating in the framework of flavor chemistry (Fig. 3)

The phenology of plant forms depends on carbon fluxes, humidity, diurnal temperature range, and surface energy balance (Hanes, in print). This suggests that the databases of the control software for the proposed device should match the chromatography or chromato-mass spectrometry data and the measured environmental parameters at each time moment of monitoring. Note that microfauna also influences many of these parameters, since the gas exchange in photosynthesis (Geider 1992) is opposite to the gas exchange in respiration of microfauna (Maina 1998), which cannot but influence their interactions in terms of physiological ecology (Kozlowski 1990). Therefore, it is necessary to either guarantee the absence of microfauna (invertebrates) in soil and on plants (as a quarantine of seedlings before experiments or monitoring) or to somehow take this into account in a mathematical model describing the effects of their molecular emission on equilibrium of the system using multivariable feedbacks (Skogestad & Postlethwaite 2005) . All these examples of abiotic and biotic factors interfering with monitoring of the described local forestation model are intended to demonstrate that the aerochemis- try of this system is complex. This necessarily entails the need in additional methods for data analysis and collection.

As a rule, a computer-aided identification of organic compounds utilizes a set of methods rather than a single technique and determines both qualitative and quantitative specific features of an analyte converting them into various molecular descriptors (Todeschini & Consonni 2009) according to the characteristics measurable with the used tools. Good practice recommends involving chromatography and mass spectrometry in addition to spectroscopy in computer identification of analytes using databases (Vershinin et al. 2002). According to the proposed ideology for deigning/programming the monitoring device, the system will analyze its internal state over all sources of the signal to send real-time signals, be regulated, and allow for defining complex pa- rametrics. Thus, we actually speak about development of an expert system (Hemmer 2007) with the functions of multisensor data fusion [Hall & McMullen 2004, Raol 2009, Mitchell 2010] and integrated identification, corresponding to signal collection from many sources. Since historically (starting from the 1930s), auxanometers were combined with monochromators or monochromator spectrometers8 (1930), it is logical to supplement gas chromatography with at least optical spectral analysis (which complies with (Vershinin et al., 2002) . First, from the standpoint of nonlinear physics of ecosystems (Meron 2013), the spectral peak dynamics during vegetation and transitions between states (alternation of phenophases) is nonlinear, corresponding to biophysical kinetics of this process. Second, most of the selfconsistent models for forest dynamics (Botkin 1993, Buongiorno et al. 2003, Pretzsch 2010) are nonlinear and involve the corresponding feedbacks. These two facts suggest that identification properties of the experimental chamber interior as a dynamic system (Isermann & Münchhof 2011) are interpretable as parameters of complex system dynamics (Giantomassi 2012) for nonlinear identification (Nelles 2001) in complex networks (Barrat et al. 2012), which are actually the ecological systems in terms of multisensor information (in particular, in remote sensing systems (Lee et al. 2013)). In terms of the mixed methods approaches (MMA; a combination of different methods aimed at verification and assessment of fal- sifiability of each method and the overall data array obtained using these methods) (Creswell 2013), only matching of the gas chromatography, optical spectroscopy, and climate monitoring data can give a sufficiently high-quality and unambiguous pattern of the processes in the proposed device at different levels of endo- and exoecological connections. This interferes with a systematic identification and fingerprinting of individual species phenophases unless controlled environmental conditions are provided. As for gas chromatography, an intricate mathematical apparatus involving multivariate methods (Cserhati 2008) is used for tackling complex problems irresolvable within routine approaches. Note that multivariate chemometrics in terms of QSAR (quantitative structure-activity relationships) approach can be matched to the methods determining structural correlations of individual biochemical properties (Mager 1988).

This is important for the ideology underlying design of the experimental facility type considered here, since QSAR methods are widely applied in simulating the environmental response to external impacts (Nendza 1998). The computer methods selecting the response according to physical properties of molecular agents had been long ago designed (Bumble 1999). Such an approach is also appropriate for inverse problems; therefore, it can be used for modeling in monitoring of molecular emission of forest plants and their communities (for example, in the described monitoring facility or the chambers of biotron or phytotron types with the sampling system similar to the described one)9. Typically, multimodal and multi- parametric remote sensing systems are used combination with geographic information systems (GIS) for global monitoring (Rodriguez- Bachiller & Glasson 2004) . However, the approximation of global dynamics (with interpolation for relatively local regions) for local phytophysiological monitoring of forest systems may be in part replaced by phytotron-based monitoring with multiparametric recording and variation of experimental environmental conditions in climate chambers/facilities similar in their design to the chambers proposed in this paper (even to testing a winter recording of vital parameters during a frost-resistant germination of forest species (Warnock 2013)) creating the artificial microclimate simulating particular geographic regions, which induces the corresponding quantifiable phytophysiological responses (Jones 1992)10.

As a rule, hyperspectral imaging (for example, see: "Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Tropical and Sub-Tropical Forests" (Ed. by M. Kalacska, G. A. Sanchez-Azofeifa, 2008) and "Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Vegetation" (Ed. by P. S. Thenka- bail, J. G. Lyon, A. Huete, 2011) ) is used in multiparametric remote sensing systems for mapping vegetation as well as lidar-based methods, in particular, laser lidar devices (Helt 2005) (to say nothing of resource-intensive methods involving interferometry and polarimetry (Lavalle 2012) ) . Therefore, it is reasonable to combine the monochromators or scanning laser equipment in chromato-auxanometry devices with spectral mapping of plant surface to better match the GIS prototype . This problem is in no way redundant, since it is known that spectral reflectance characteristics may vary even within individual plant. This may be caused by

(i) different accessibility of photosynthetically active radiation to a leaf and the corresponding change in pigment concentration (Gitel- son et al. 2003);
(ii) changes in the leaf pigment composition during plastid biogenesis from proplastids through mature forms to gerontoplasts (Biswal 2003)
(iii) stress-induced effects on leaf (Mohammed et al . 2000) (as mentioned above, this changes the gas molecular emission by plants);
(iv) change in the plant water content and the ratio of water to oxidized species (Dasgupta 2009) ;
(v) gradient in chlorophyll content (Chen & Chen 2008); and
(vi) variation in the plant developmental forms and the corresponding differences in leaf structure (Sims & Gamon 2002) to eventual changes in dead leaves (for example, see: Plant Cell Death Processes. Ed. by L. D. Nooden, 2003).

All these processes are accompanied by gas molecular emission to the degree that makes it possible to match the leaf reflectance spectra and emission chromatograms or mass spectra recorded online simultaneously with the former using a multichannel system. Spectral mapping can be performed in a real-time streamline mode using cooled (as an ideal case; not obligatory) digital cameras and subsequent mathematical processing involving parallel data classification using mainframe computers (Chang 2003, 2013) and 3D visualization (Kim 2002).

The STATA/MP software package (Becketti 2013) is appropriate for processing the data recorded using an auxanometer-based device utilizing physical measurement principles with the help of multiprocessor/multicore computers. This software package allows not only for processing of time series data, but also for maximum likelihood estimation (Gould e al. 2010), multilevel modeling corresponding to multidimensional strategy of data collection (Rabe-Hesketh & Skrondal 2012 a,b), as well as the cause and effect clarification using structural equations (Acock 2013) to say nothing of conventional regression analysis (Kohler & Kreuter 2012). Thus, the problems of spectral pattern recognition (Siddiqui et al. 1999) (in particular, IR spectra (Zachor 1983), since multispectral/hyperspectral remote sensing in IR range is available (Vollmer & Möllmann 2010) to reflect the thermal leaf properties in a climate chamber) solved by computer processing of spectral monitoring data as discovery of characteristic patterns in terms of bioinformatics (Parida 2007) are supplemented in the case of hyperspectral sensing with multispectral pattern recognition (in particular, see "Multispectral Image Processing and Pattern Recognition (Ed. by J. Shen, P. S. P. Wang, T. Zhang, 2001) ) in all spectral ranges as, for example, in terms of the ISODATA algorithm (Ball & Hall 1965) . Moreover, when considering the processes in dynamics, this is supplemented with a new level of spectral data, namely, the product of a window-based spectral processing of variation in phytophysiological parameters in the time cycles determined by circadian and phenological rhythms (possibly, s ee: "Spectral Theory And Nonl i near Anal ys i s Wi t h Applications to Spatial Ecology" (Ed. by Cano- Casanova S., Lopez-Gomez J., Mora-Corral C., 2005) . In this case, in addition to the optical and other data recorded by remote sensing of vegetation based on standard physical principles when a mobile detector cannot target individual flora elements during monitoring (Jones & Vaughan 2010), stationary detectors of an auxanometer have an additional advantage of analyzing phenological and phenospectral dynamics of these factors and indicators of physiological response (this dynamics is actually the object of nonlinear ecological analysis - see above), in particular, in the physiological ecology of woody plants (Kozlowski 1990)). Thus, it is evident that combination of optical, chromatographic, and multispectral image information requires that the hybrid device has considerable computing power. However, a comprehensive computer-aided processing of this type is fully justified by high predictive properties of the constructed model applicable to pragmatic forest management. In other words, instead of auxanometry as monitoring of the "yesterday's" growth coefficients (which can be also determined via conformal transformations (Gradov, Notchenko 2012)) of a forest plant- let/ seedling, we obtain a high-quality identification of the phases constituting the development and a multiparametric equivalent model with predictive capability (over a limited time period), in particular, for programmed changes in pa- rametrizable environmental characteristics.

CONCLUSIONS

Thus, we propose an auxanometry-based integrated device that

(1) Makes it possible to monitor the primary growth of forest tree species in developmental perspective owing to the use of an intergraded qualitative criterion as the indicator of growth dynamics rather that a quantitative criterion (as in routine auxa- nometry, implying an increase in the seedling length as a sole criterion for growth). The integrated qualitative criterion is formed based on a one-to-one matching of the analytical chemistry data on plant molecular emission and variation in environmental characteristics, which allows for analysis of the feedbacks between plant growth/development and change in environmental parametrics;
(2) In the course of operation in various modes with training to pattern recognition accompanied by database updating, allows not only for studying and modeling of only plant developmental pattern characteristic for a certain standard space of traits, but also for assessment of experimental response of ecological trait structure to changes in environmental parameters. This means the possibility to use phenological, simulative biogeographic, biometeorological, bioclimatologic, and ecological- physiological approaches according to the research need (if allowed by the deign of a biotron, climate chamber, or greenhouse used for germinating forest tree seedlings) compiling the corresponding spectral and chromatography data as correlation patterns in databases for further use;
(3) In the case of a phenospectral experimental germination, makes it possible to program the temperature mode and regulate it via a feedback, providing a precise prediction for the date of vegetation onset based on summing of the effective temperatures or detecting their trend. This allows for reconstruction of the order of germination or vegetation of individual plant forms in correlation with characteristic parameters of artificial climate (for example, it is known that the sum of effective temperatures required for the maple Acer is 15 6.2 ° C and for the linden Tilia, 7 3 9 ° C ; correspondingly, the linden in temperature ranging in a database will be placed later than the maple);
(4) Automatically classifies the woody plants in model phytocommunities according to a set of characteristics into phenorhythm types or phenological groups using a more detailed scale as compared with the earlier used gradation of phenorhythm types, comprising only two evident types of evergreen and defoliating trees; and
(5) Provides the regulation of climate chamber parameters via recording the feedback from plants using detectors and sensors for their molecular emission in a controllable physical environment, i.e., the parameters recorded by the sensor part of the integrated climate chamber themselves are the signal for changing its operation mode.

LITERATURE CITED

Acock, A.C. 2013. Discovering Structural Equation Modeling Using Stata. Stata Press, College Station, Texas, 304 pp.

Ball, G.H. & D.J. Hall 1965. Isodata: a method of data analysis and pattern classification. Stanford Research Institute, Office of Naval Research. Information Sciences Branch, Menlo Park, California, 79 pp.

Barnes, C.R. 1887. A Registering Auxanometer. Botanical Gazette 12(7):150-152.

Barrat, A., M. Barthélemy & A.Vespignani 2012. Dynamical Processes on Complex Networks. Cambridge University Press, 361 pp.

Becketti, S. 2013. Introduction to Time Series using Stata. Stata Press, College Station, Texas, 741 pp.

Beerling, D.J. & P.J. Franks 2010. Plant science: The hidden cost of transpiration. Nature 464:4954 96.

Bergann, F. 1930. Untersuchungen über Lichtwachs- tum, Lichtkrümmung und Lichtabfall bei Avena sativa mit Hilfe monochromatischen Lichtes. Planta 10(4):666-743.

Binder, B.M. 2007. Rapid Kinetic Analysis of Ethylene Growth Responses in Seedlings: New Insights into Ethylene Signal Transduction. Journal of Plant Growth Regulation 26(2):131-142.

Biswal, U.C., B. Biswal & M.K. Raval 2003. Chloro- plast Biogenesis: From Proplastid to Gerontoplast. Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht - Boston - London, 380 pp.

Botkin, D. B. 1993. Forest Dynamics: An Ecological Model. Oxford University Press, Oxford - New York, 328 pp.

Bovie, W.T. 1912. A Precision Auxanometer. Botanical Gazette 53(6):504-509.

Bovie, W. T. 1915. A Simplified Precision Auxanometer. American Journal of Botany 2(2): 95-99.

Brodribb, T.J. & T.S. Feild 2010. Leaf hydraulic evolution led a surge in leaf photosynthetic capacity during early angiosperm diversification. Ecology Letters 13(2):175-183.

Budagovskaya, N.V. & V.I. Guliaev 2002. Effect of calcium channel blocker on the growth dynamics of plants studied by laser interference auxanometry. Developments in Plant and Soil Sciences 92:204-205.

Budagovskaya, N.V. & V.I. Guliaev 2003. Rapid and Slow Response Reactions of Plants on Effect of Antioxidant Ambiol. In: Advanced Research on Plant Lipids. Proc. of the 15th Intern. Symp. on Plant Lipids (Ed. by N. Murata, M. Yamada, I. Nishida, H. Oku- yama, J. Sekiya, W. Hajime), pp. 323-32 6, Springer (Kluwer), Dordrecht.

Bumble, S. 1999. Computer Generated Physical Properties. CRC Press, Boca Raton, 288 pp.

Bumpus, H.C. 1887. A Simple and Inexpensive SelfRegistering Auxanometer. Botanical Gazette 12(7):149-150.

Buongiorno, J., S. Zhu, D. Zhang, J. Turner & D. Tomberlin 2003. The Global Forest Products Model: Structure, Estimation, and Applications . Academic Press, Amsterdam - Boston - London - New York - Oxford - Paris - San Diego - San Francisco - Singapore - Sydney - Tokyo, 300 pp.

Burgerstein, A. 1884. Das pflanzenphysiologische Institut der K.K. Wiener Universitat von 1873-1884. Österreichische botanische Zeitschrift 34(12):418- 4 22.

Chang, C.-I. 2003. Hyper spectral Imaging: Tech niques for Spectral Detection and Classification. Kluwer Academic - Plenum Publishers, New York, 367 pp.

Chang, C.-I. 2013. Hyper spectral Data Processing: Algorithm Design and Analysis. Wiley, Hoboken, 1164 pp.

Chen, J.-C. & C.-T. Chen 2008. Correlation Analy sis Between Indices of Tree Leaf Spectral Reflectance and Chlorophyll Content. The International Archives of the Photogramme try, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences XXXVII(B7):231-238.

Cholodny, N. 1929. Über das Wachstum des vertikal und horizontal orientierten Stengels in Zusammenhang mit der Frage nach der hormonalen Natur der Tropis- men. Planta 7(5):702-719.

Christian, M. & H. Lüthen 2000. New methods to analyse auxin-induced growth I: Classical auxinology goes Arabidopsis. Plant Growth Regulation 32(2- 3):107-114.

Clarke, L.J. 1935. Botany As An Experimental Science - In Laboratory And Garden. Oxford University Press, Milton, 138 pp.

Claussen, M., H. Lüthe, M. Blatt & M. Böttger 1997. Auxin-induced growth and its linkage to potassium channels. Planta 201(2):227-234.

Courtney, A.D. & A.J. Wilkinson 1978. A stepping motor auxanometer to record rhizome elongation continuously. Journal of Experimental Botany 29(6)1351- 1361.

Creswell, J.W. 2013. Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches. SAGE Publications Inc., Los Angeles - London - New Delhi - Singapore - Washington, 304 pp.

Cserhati, T. 2008. Multivariate Methods in Chromatography: A Practical Guide. Wiley, Hoboken - Chichester, 352 pp.

Dasgupta, S. 2009. Remote Sensing of Vegetation Water and Fire Risk: Selected Research Topics. VDM, Saarbrücken, 176 pp.

Davidson, E.A., M. Keller, H.E. Erickson, L.V. Verchot & E. Veldkamp 2000. Testing a conceptual model of soil emissions of nitrous and nitric oxides. BioScience 50(8):667-680.

De Rovira, D. 2004. Dictionary of Flavors. Wiley- Blackwell, Ames, Iova, 736 pp.

Degenhardt, D.C., J.K. Greene & A. Khalilian 2012. Temporal Dynamics and Electronic Nose Detection of Stink Bug-Induced Volatile Emissions from Cotton Bolls. Psyche 2012 (Art. ID 236762): 1-9.

Dmitriev, M.T., V.A. Mishhihin & E.V. Stepanov 1983. Gas chromatographic determination of phyton- cides in the air. Gigiena i Sanitarija 7:43-45 (in Russian). [Дмитириев M. Т . и др. Газохроматографическое определение фитонцидов в воздухе / / Гигиена и санитария. № 7, С. 43-45.]

Drosos, J.C., M. Viola-Rhenals & R. Vivas-Reyes 2010. Quantitative structure-retention relationships of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons gas- chromatographic retention indices. Journal of Chromatography A 1217(26):4411-4421.

Du, H., J. Wang, Z. Hu & X. Yao 2008. Quantitative Structure-Retention relationship study of the constituents of saffron aroma in SPME-GC-MS based on the projection pursuit regression method. Talanta 77(1):360-365.

Engel, H. & M. Heimann 1949. Weitere Untersuchun- gen über periodische Guttation. Planta 37(3): 437450.

Evans, M.L., T.J. Mulkey & M.J. Vesper 1980. Auxin action on proton influx in corn roots and its correlation with growth. Planta 148 (5):510-512.

Evans, M.L. 1984. Functions of Hormones at the Cellular Level of Organization. Encyclopedia of Plant Physiology 10:23-79.

Evans, M.L., H. Ishikawa & M.A. Estelle 1994. Responses of Arabidopsis roots to auxin studied with high temporal resolution: Comparison of wild type and auxin-response mutants. Planta 194(2):215-222.

Fernandez, S.R. & E. Wagner 1994. A New Method of Measurement and Analysis of the Stem Extension Growth Rate to Demonstrate Complete Synchronisation of Chenopodium rubrum Plants by Environmental Conditions. Journal of Plant Physiology 144(3)362-369.

Flavor and Health Benefits of Small Fruits (ACS Symposium Series) . Ed. by M. Qian & A. Rimando . American Chemical Society, Washington, 2010, 336 pp.

Flavor, Fragrance, and Odor Analysis. Ed. by R. Marsili. CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2011, 280 pp.

Flavours and Fragrances: Chemistry, Bioprocessing and Sustainability. Ed. by R. G. Berger. Springer, Berlin - Heidelberg - New York, 2010, 664 pp.

Fredrickson, E.L., R.E. Estell & M.D. Remmenga 2007. Volatile compounds on the leaf surface of intact and regrowth tarbush (Flourensia cernua DC) canopies. Journal of Chemical Ecology 33(10):1867- 1875.

Fritsch, K. 1905. Akademien, Botanische Gesell- schaften, Vereine, Kongresse etc. Österreichische botanische Zeitschrift 55(6):245-251.

Gas Enzymology. Ed. by H. Degn, R.P. Cox & H. Toftlund. Proceedings of a Symposium held at Odense University, Denmark, 1984. Kluwer Acad. Pub., Dordrecht, 1985, 264 pp.

Geider, R. 1992. Algal Photosynthesis: The Measurement of Algal Gas Exchange. Springer, 256 pp.

Giantomassi, A. 2012. Modeling estimation and identification of complex system dynamics: issues and solutions. Lambert Academic Publishing, Saar- brücken, 136 pp.

Gitelson, A.A., Y. Gritz & M.N. Merzlyak 2003. Relationships between leaf chlorophyll content and spectral reflectance and algorithms for nondestructive chlorophyll assessment in higher plant leaves. Journal of Plant Physiology 160:271 -282.

Golden, K. E. 1894. An Auxanometer for the Registration of Growth of Stems in Thickness. Botanical Gazette 19(3):113-116.

Gould, W., J. Pitblado & B. Poi 2010. Maximum Likelihood Estimation with Stata. Stata Press, College Station, Texas, 352 pp.

Gradov, O.V. & A.V. Notchenko 2012. Semiautomatic dendrochronography for research on morphogenesis and teratomorphosis on the saw cuts of higher plants. Lesotechnicheskij zhurnal 4(8):47-57 (in Russian with English summary). [Градов 0.В. & A.В. Нотченко 2012. Полуавтоматическая дендрохронография для исследования морфогенеза и тератоморфозов на спилах высших растений // Лесотехнический журнал. Т . 4, № 8. С. 47-57.]

Hall, D. L. & S.A.H. McMullen 2004. Mathematical Techniques in Multisensor Data Fusion. Artech House, Boston - London, 466 pp.

Handbook of Fruit and Vegetable Flavors. Ed. by Y.H. Hui. Wiley, Hoboken, 2010, 1095 pp.

Hanes, J.M. 2013. Spring leaf phenology and the diurnal temperature range in a temperate maple forest. International Journal of Biometeorology (in print).

Hari, J., M. Kanninen & P. Hari 1 97 8. An electronic auxanometer for field use. Silva Fennica 12(4):275-279.

Helt, M.F. 2005. Vegetation Identification With LIDAR. Thes. Naval Postgraduate School. Monterey, California, 83 pp.

Hemmer, M.C. 2007. Expert Systems in Chemistry Research. CRC Press, Boca Raton, 416 pp.

Heydanek, M.G. & R.J. McGorrin 1981. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy investigations on the flavor chemistry of oat groats. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 29(5):950-954.

Hoffmann, E.A., Z.A. Fekete, R. Rajkó, I. Palinkó & T. Körtvélyesi 2009. Theoretical characterization of gas-liquid chromatographic stationary phases with quantum chemical descriptors. Journal of Chromatography A 1216(12):2540-2547.

Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Tropical and SubTropical Forests. Ed. by M. Kalacska & G.A. Sanchez- Azofeifa. CRC Press, Boca Raton - London - New York, 2008, 352 pp.

Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Vegetation. Ed. by P.S. Thenkabail, J.G. Lyon & A. Huete. CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2011, 781 pp.

Iglesias-Rodriguez, M.D., P.R. Halloran , R.E.M. Rickaby, I.R. Hall, E. Colmenero-Hidalgo, J.R. Gittins, D.R.H. Green et al . 2008. Phytoplankton Calcification in a High-CO2 World. Science 320:336 -340.

Inman-Bamber, N.G. 1995. Automatic plant extension measurement in sugarcane in relation to temperature and soil moisture. Field Crops Research 42(2-3):135- 142.

Isermann, R. & M. Münchhof 2011. Identification of Dynamic Systems: An Introduction with Applications. Springer, Heidelberg - Dordrecht - London - New York, 730 pp.

Jaffe, M.J. 1 973. Thigmomorphogenesis : The response of plant growth and development to mechanical stimulation. Planta 114(2):143-157.

Jennings, W. 1980. Qualitative Analysis of Flavor and Fragrance Volatiles by Glass Capillary Gas Chromatography. Academic Press, New York - London - Sydney - Toronto - San Francisco, 472 pp.

Jin, H.J., S.H. Lee, T.H. Kim, J. Park, H.S. Song, T.H. Park & S. Hong 2012. Nanovesicle-based bioelectronic nose platform mimicking human olfactory signal transduction. Biosensors and Bioelectronics 35(1):335-341.

Jones, H.G. 1992. Plants and Microclimate: A Quantitative Approach to Environmental Plant Physiology. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge - New York - Melbourne, 456 pp.

Jones, H.G. & R.A. Vaughan 2010. Remote Sensing of Vegetation: Principles, Techniques, and Applications. Oxford University Press, Oxford - New York, 400 pp.

Jönsson, S., L.A. Eriksson & B. van Bavel 2008. Multivariate characterisation and quantita tive structure-property relationship modeling of ni- troaromatic compounds. Analytica Chimica Acta 621(2):155-162.

Katou, K. & K. Ichino 1982. Effects of carbon dio xi de on t he s pat i al l y s e par at e e l e ct roge ni c i on pumps and the growth rate in the hypocotyl of Vigna sesquipedalis. Planta 155( 6):486-492.

Keppler, F., J.T.G. Hamilton, M. Brass & T. Rock- mann 2006. Methane emissions from terrestrial plants under aerobic conditions. Nature:187-191.

Kim, K.S. 2002. 3D Visualization of an Invariant Display Strategy for Hyperspectral Imagery. Thes. Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California, 67 pp.

Kim, S.Y. & T.J. Mulkey 1997. Effect of ethylene antagonists on auxin-induced inhibition of intact primary root elongation in maize (Zeamays L.). Journal of Plant Biology 40(4):256-260.

Knohl, A. & E. Veldkamp 2011. Global change: Indirect feedbacks to rising CO2. Nature 475:177-178.

Kohler, U. & F. Kreuter 2012. Data Analysis Using Stata. Stata Press, College Station, Texas, 497 pp.

Kolb, B. & L.S. Ettre 2006. Static Headspace-Gas Chromatography: Theory and Practice. Wiley, Hoboken, 350 pp.

Kottek, M., J. Grieser, C. Beck, B. Rudolf & F. Rubel 2006. World Map of the Köppen-Geiger climate classification updated. Meteorologische Zeitschrif 15(3):259-263.

Kozlowski, T.T. 1990. The Physiological Ecology of Woody Plants. Academic Press, San Diego -New York - Boston - London - Sidney - Tokyo -Toronto, 678 pp.

Kozlowski, T.T. & S.G. Pallardy 1996. Physiology of Woody Plants. Academic Press, San Diego - London - Boston - New York - Sidney - Tokyo -Toronto, 411 pp.

Kunkel, R. & W.H. Gardner 1965. Potato tuber hydration and its effect on blackspot of Russet Burbank potatoes in the Columbia Basin of Washington. American Potato Journal 42(5):109-124.

Lago, J.H.G., O.A. Favero & P. Romoff 2006. Microclimatic Factors and Phenology Influences in the Chemical Composition of the Essential Oils from Pit- tosporum undulatum Vent. Leaves. Journal of Brazilian Chemical Society 17(7):1334-1338.

Lavalle, M. 2012. Remote Sensing of Vegetation by Polarimetric Space Interferometers: Models and Methods. Lambert Academic Publishing, Saarbrücken, 220 pp.

Lee, M.J., S.W. Jeon & W.K. Song 2013. Designation for an Ecological Network using Remote Sensing: Focusing on the North-East Asia. Lambert Academic Publishing, 64 pp.

Lepeschkin, W. 1925. Lehrbuch der Pflanzenphysio- logie Auf Physikalisch-Chemischer Grundlage. Be- schreibung und Erklarung der Wachstumserscheinungen, 191-242 pp.

Li, Q., A. Nakadai, H. Matsushima, Y. Miyaza ki, A.M. Krensky, T. Kawada & K.Morimoto 2006. Phy- toncides (wood essential oils) induce human natural killer cell activity. Immunopharmacology and Immu- notoxicology 28(2):319-333.

Li, Q., K. Morimoto, M. Kobayashi, H. Inagaki, M. Katsumata, Y. Hirata, K. Hirata,et al. 2008. Visiting a forest, but not a city, increases human natural killer activity and expression of anti-cancer proteins. International Journal of Immunopathology and Pharmacollogy 21(1) 117-127.

Li, Q., Morimoto K., Kobayashi M., Inagaki H., Katsumata M., Hirata Y., Hirata K., et al . 2008. A forest bathing trip increases human natural killer activity and expression of anti-cancer proteins in female subjects. Journal of Biological Regulators and Homeostatic Agents, 22 (1):45-55.

Liao, Y.C., S.W. Chien, M.C. Wang, Y. Shen, P.L. Hung & B. 2006. Das Effect of transpiration on Pb uptake by lettuce and on water soluble low molecular weight organic acids in rhizosphere. Chemosphere 65 (2):343-351.

Liao, Y.C., S.W. Chien, M.C. Wang, Y. Shen & K. Seshaiah 2007. Relationship between lead uptake by lettuce and water-soluble low-molecular-weight organic acids in rhizosphere as influenced by transpiration. Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 17(55):8640-8649.

Literatur-Übersicht 1907. Österreichische botanische Zeitschrift 57(2):74-85.

Lloyd, F.E. 1903. A New and Cheap Form of Auxanom- eter. Torreya 3 (7):97-100.

Mager, P.P. 1988. Multivariate Chemometrics in QSAR: A Dialogue. Wiley, New York - Chichester - Toronto - Brisbane - Singapure, 345 pp.

Maina, J.N. 1998. The Gas Exchangers: Structure, Function, and Evolution of the Respiratory Processes. Springer, Berlin, 498 pp.

Malone, M., M. Herron & M.A. Morales 2002. Continuous measurement of macronutrient ions in the transpiration stream of intact plants using the meadow spittlebug coupled with ion chromatography. Plant Physiology 130(3):1436-1442.

McBride, R. & M.L. Evans 1977. Auxin inhibition of acid-and fusicoccin-induced elongation in lentil roots. Planta 136(2):97-102.

McKown, A.D., H. Cochard & L. Sack 2010. Decoding leaf hydraulics with a spatially explicit model: principles of venation architecture and implications for its evolution. American Naturalist 175:447-460.

Meron, E. 2013. Nonlinear Physics of Ecosystems. CRC Press, Boca Raton, 350 pp.

Meyer, W.S. & G.C. Green 1981. Plant indicators of wheat and soybean crop water stress. Irrigation Science 2(3):167-176.

Mitchell, H.B. 2010. Multi-Sensor Data Fusion: An Introduction. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, 296 pp.

Mohammed, G.H., T.L. Noland, D. Irving, P.H. Sampson, P.J. Zarco-Tejada & J.R. Miller 2000. Natural and stress-induced effects on leaf spectral reflectance in Ontario species. Forest Research Report No.156, 34 pp.

Monje, O. & B. Bugbee 1996. Characterizing photosynthesis and transpiration of plant communities in controlled environments. Acta Horticulturae 40:123 128.

Mulkey, T.J., M.L. Evans & K.M. Kuzmanoff 1983. The kinetics of abscisic acid action on root growth and gravitropism. Planta 157(2):150-157.

Multispectral Image Processing and Pattern Recognition (Series in Machine Perception and Artificial Intelligence, 44). Ed. by J. Shen, P. S. P. Wang, T. Zhang. World Scientific Pub. Co Inc., Singapore- New Jersey - London -Hong Kong, 2001, 130 pp.

Mutaftschiev, S., R. Prat, M. Pierron, G. Devil- liers & R. Goldberg 1997. Relationships between cell-wall (5-1, 3-endoglucanase activity and auxin- induced elongation in mung bean hypocotyl segments. Protoplasma 199(1-2):49-56.

Nelles, O. 2001. Nonlinear System Identification: From Classical Approaches to Neural Networks and Fuzzy Models. Springer, Berlin - Heidelberg - New York, 785 pp.

Nendza, M. 1998. Structure-Activity Relationships in Environmental Sciences. Chapman and Hall, London, 288 pp.

Nestler, A. 1909. Das pflanzenphysiologische In- stitut der k. k. deutschen Universitat in Prag. Ös- terreichische botanische Zeitschrift 59(2):54-62.

Parida, L. 2007. Pattern Discovery in Bioinformatics: Theory & Algorithms. CRC, Boca raton - London - New York, 512 pp.

Peel, M.C., B.L. Finlayson & T.A. McMahon 2007. Updated world map of the Köppen-Geiger climate classification. Hydrology and Earth System Sciences 11:1633-1644.

Persaud, K. & G. Dodd 1982. Analysis of discrimination mechanisms in the mammalian olfactory system using a model nose. Nature 299:352-355.

Plant Cell Death Processes. Ed. by L. D. Nooden. Academic Press, Amsterdam - Boston - Heidelberg - London - New York - Oxford - Paris - San Diego - San Francisco - Singapore - Sydney - Tokyo, 2003, 392 pp.

Polesskaya, O.G. 2007. Plant cell and active oxygen forms. "Universitet" Book House, Moscow, 140 pp. (in Russian) . [Полесская О. Г. 2007. Растительная клетка и активные формы кислорода. Москва: Книжный дом "Университет". 140 с.]

Pretzsch, H. 2010. Forest Dynamics, Growth and Yield: From Measurement to Model. Springer, Heidelberg - Dordrecht - London - New York, 683 pp.

Puc, M. & I. Kasprzyk 2013. The patterns of Corylus and Alnus pollen seasons and pollination periods in two Polish cities located in different climatic regions. Aerobiologia, (in print)

Qaderi, M.M. & D.M. Reid 2009. Methane emissions from six crop species exposed to three components of global climate change: temperature, ultraviolet-B radiation and water stress. Physiologia Plantarum 137(2):139-147.

Rabe-Hesketh, S. & A. Skrondal 2012. Multilevel and Longitudinal Modeling Using Stata, Vol. 1. Stata Press, College Station, Texas, 497 pp.

Rabe-Hesketh, S. & A. Skrondal 2012. Multilevel and Longitudinal Modeling Using Stata, Vol. 2. Stata Press, College Station, Texas, 477 pp.

Raol, J. R. 2009. Multi-Sensor Data Fusion with MATLAB. CRC Press, Boca Raton, 568 pp.

Rassadina, V.A., E.B. Yaronskaya, I.V. Ver- shilovskaya, V.M. Yahorov, & N.G. Averina 2007. Electronic auxanometry - the new method for plant growth reaction registration. Zemljarobstva i ahova raslin: navukova-praktychny chasopls (2) : 19-20 (in Russian). [Рассадина В.В., Яронская Е.Б., Вершилов- ская И.В., Егоров В.М., Аверина Н.Г. 2007. Электронная ауксанометрия - новый способ регистрации ростовой реакции растений // Земляробства и ахова рослин (Земледелие и защита растений). № 2. С. 19-20.]

Rayle, D.L. & R. Cleland 1972. Rapid Growth Responses in the Avena Coleoptile: A Comparison of the Action of Hydrogen Ions, CO2, and Auxin. Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Plant Growth Substances, Australia, 44-51 pp.

Röck, F. , N. Ba rs an & U. We i mar 2 0 0 8 . E l e ct roni c Nose: Current Status and Future Trends. Chemical Reviews 108(2):705-725.

Rodriguez-Bachiller, A. & J. Glasson 2004. Expert Systems and Geographic Information Systems for Impact Assessment. Taylor & Francis, London - New York, 408 pp.

Schwarz, J., R. Gries, K. Hillier, N. Vickers & G. Gries 2009. Phenology of semiochemical-mediated host foragi ng by t he we s t e rn boxe l de r bug, Bo i s e a rubrolineata, an aposematic seed predator. Journal of Chemical Ecology 35(l):58-70.

Siddiqui, K.J., D.L. Eastwood & Y-H. Liu 1 999. Spectral pattern recognition: the methodology. SPIE Proceedings 3854:84-97.

Sims, D. A. & J.A. Gamon 2002. Relationships between leaf pigment content and spectral reflectance across a wide range of species, leaf structures and developmental stages. Remote Sensing of Environment 81:337 - 354.

Skogestad, S. & I. Postlethwaite 2005. Multivariable Feedback Control: Analysis and Design. Wiley, Chichester - New York - Brisbane -Toronto - Singapore, 592 pp.

Spalding, E.P. & N.D. Miller 2013. Image analysis is driving a renaissance in growth measurement. Current Opinion in Plant Biology 16(1):100-104.

Sparks, W.C. 1958. A review of abnormalities in the potato due to water uptake and translocation. American Potato Journal 35(3):430-436.

Spectral Theory And Nonlinear Analysis With Applications to Spatial Ecology. Ed. by Cano- Casanova S., J. Lopez-Gomez & Mora-Corral C. World Scientific Pub. Co Inc., New Jersey - London - Singapore - Beijing - Shanghai - Hong Kong - Taipei - Chennai, 2005, 276 pp.

Steffens, B. & H. Lüthen 2000. New methods to analyze auxin-induced growth II: The swelling reaction of protoplasts - a model system for the analysis of auxin signal transduction? Plant Growth Regulation 32(2-3)115-122.

Stone, G.E. 1892. A Simple Self-Registering Auxa- nometer. Botanical Gazette 17(4)105-107.

Taiz, L. & J.-P. Métraux 1 97 9. The kinetics of bidirectional growth of stem sections from etiolated pea seedlings in response to acid, auxin and fusicoccin. Planta 146(2):171-178.

Tan, Y. & K.J. Siebert 2008. Modeling bovine serum albumin binding of flavor compounds (alcohols, aldehydes, esters, and ketones) as a function of molecular properties. Journal of Food Science 73(1):56-63.

Todeschini, R. & V. Consonni 2009. Molecular Descriptors for Chemoinformatics (Methods and Principles in Medicinal Chemistry). Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 1257 pp.

Tucker, A.O. & T. DeBaggio 2009. The Encyclopedia of Herbs: A Comprehensive Reference to Herbs of Flavor and Fragrance. Timber Press, Portland - London, 604 pp.

van Groenigen, K.J., C.W. Osenberg & B.A. Hungate 2011. Increased soil emissions of potent greenhouse gases under increased atmospheric CO2. Nature 475:214-216.

Vershinin, V.I., B.G. Derendjaev & K.S. Lebedev 2002. Computer-assisted identification of organic compounds. Akademkniga, Moscow, 197 pp. (in Rus- sian). [Вершинин В.И., Дерендяев Б.Г., Лебедев К . С . 2002. Компьютерная идентификация органических соединений. Москва: Академкнига. 197 с .]

Vollmer, M. & K.P. Möllmann 2010. Infrared Thermal Imaging: Fundamentals, Research and Applications. Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 612 pp.

W.E.B. 1935. Botany as an Experimental Science in Laboratory and Garden. Nature 136:890.

Warnock, C. 2013. Backyard Winter Gardening: Vegetables Fresh and Simple, In Any Climate without Artificial Heat or Electricity the Way It's Been Done for 2,000 Years. Cedar Fort, Inc. Springville, 176 pp.

Went, F.A.F.C. 1933. Die Bedeutung des Wuchs- stoffes (Auxin) für Wachstum, photo- und geotropi- sche Krümmungen. Naturwissenschaften 21 (1):1-7.

Werkhoff, P., M. Guntert, G. Krammer, H. Sommer & J. Kaulen 1998. Vacuum Headspace Method in Aroma Research: Flavor Chemistry of Yellow Passion Fruits.

Journal of Agricultural and Food Chemistry 46:1076-1093.

Wise, P.M., M.J. Olsson & Cain W.S. 2000. Quantification of Odor Quality. Chemical Senses 25(4)429- 4 43.

Zachor, A.S. 1983. Spectral pattern recognition in IR remote sensing. Applied Optics 22(17): 2699-2703.

Figure Legends

Fig.1. Outdated auxanometric devices: a - chrono- graphic auxanometer designed by Pfeffer (1903); b - auxanometer / auxanograph construction described in Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1950, 1970); c - an auxanometer similar to one designed by Pfeffer, d - an arc auxanometer.

Fig. 2: a, b - Bovie Precision Auxanometer and its measuring unit (taken from: Knott, L. E. 1921. L.E. Knott Apparatus Company: Scientific Instruments, Catalogue 26), c - Harcourt Students’ Auxanometer (Ibid), d - Botanical Recording Lever (taken from: Palmer, C. F. 1934. Palmer Research and Students’ Apparatus for Physiology, Pharmacology, Psychology, Bacteriology, Phonetics, Botany etc.)

Fig. 3: DESI-analysis and mass-spectrometric chemical distinction of blooming flowers (photo taken from http://www.sciencedaily.com/ , http://news.sciencemag.org/)

ХРОМАТО-АУКСАНОМЕТРИЯ И ХРОМАТО-МАСС-АУКСАНОМЕТРИЯ В ФЕНОЛОГИЧЕСКОМ СТАДИЙНОМ МОНИТОРИНГЕ ЛЕСНЫХ ПОРОД НА ОСНОВЕ ФЛЕЙВОХИМИЧЕСКИХ И ГАЗОХИМИЧЕСКИХ ПРИНЦИПОВ С АВТОМАТИЧЕСКОЙ ДИНАМИЧЕСКОЙ ИДЕНТИФИКАЦИЕЙ ПАТТЕРНОВ

Градов О.В.

SIAM Activity Group of Life Sciences, USA

Институт Энергетических Проблем Химической Физики

РАН, Москва, РФ

Die uns vertrauten grünen Gewachse zeigen im allgemeinen dem flüchtigen Blicke so wenig Beweglichkeit, dak man schon genauer hinsehen muk , um sich von ihrem Vorhandensein zu überzeugen. Still und gerauschlos geht da alles vor sich, ohne Larm, ohne Zappeln, Hasten und Fliehen. Aber man nehme sich nur die Zeit in warmen Frühlingstagen etwa eine Rokkastanie zu beobachten, wie sie ihre Knospen, entfaltet. Welch eine Fülle von Veranderungen, die da in kurzer Zeit sich folgen!

E.G. Pringsheim "Das pflanzliche

Bewegungsvermögen" (Die Reizbewegungen der Pflanzen),

1912.

1. Историко-технический экскурс

Как известно, классическим и стандартным принципом измерения роста проростков древесных пород является ауксанометрия с использованием различных ауксанометров или их аналогов с автоматической записью - ауксанографов11. Простейшие регистрирующие ауксанометры были разработаны в конце XIX века [25,11,123,57] и впервые усовершенствованы в первой четверти XX века [98,19,20]. Новейшие по тем временам конструкции уже обладали чувствительностью порядка микрон и допускали использование для корреляционных измерений ростовых характеристик в сопоставлении с изменениями состава атмосферы.

За указанное время, начиная с 1884 года, журнал "Österreichische botanische Zeitschrift" неоднократно публиковал отчеты, в которых упоминалось об использовании подобных приборов в конкретных организациях или публикациях [27,52,97,114].

Высокотехнологичную по меркам начала XX века модель хронографического ауксанометра можно, в частности, обнаружить во втором томе классической "Физиологии растений" ("The Physiology of Plants") Пфеффе- pa 1903 года издания (см. илл. 1а).

Данная конструкция, не считая хронографической части, работала по принципу весов с противовесом, уровень которого изменялся при росте растения. Менее известный прецизионный ауксанометр Бови (илл. 2 а, б) отличался от неё по устройству так же, как безмен от весов с противовесом, но фактически не отличался по принципу измерений.

На том же «гравиметрическом» подходе основывались конструкции распространенного в начале XX века студенческого ауксанометра системы Харкута, выпускавшиеся фирмой Кнотта в Бостоне (см. илл. 2 в) и представлявшего собой, по сути, разновидность дугового ауксанометра (илл. 1г) , а также ботанического записывающего измерителя фирмы Пальмера 30-х гг. (илл. 2 г ).

Данные принципы устройства сохранялись практически неизменной до 1950-х гг., когда в Европе и США стал набирать силу тренд на автоматизацию лабораторного оборудования и применение электроники и оптоэлектронных и морфометрических способов детектирования роста.

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

a

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

б

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

в

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

г

Илл. 1. Устаревшие ауксанометрические конструкции: а

- конструкция из монографии Пфеффера (1903), б - конструкция ауксанометра / ауксанографа из статей БСЭ (1950, 1970 соотв.), в - авксанометр, аналогич ный прибору Пфеффера, г - дуговой ауксанометр.

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

а

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

б

Илл. 2: а, б - Прецизионный ауксанометр Бови

(Bovie Precision Auxanometer) по каталогу «Knott Apparatus Company: Scientific Instruments, Catalogue 26» 1921 года.

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

в

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

г

Илл. 2: в - Учебный / студенческий ауксанометр Харкута, выпускавшийся фирмой Кнотта в Бостоне (тот же каталог); г - Botanical Recording Lever (по каталогу «Palmer Research and Students’ Appa- ratus for Physiology, Pharmacology, Psychology, Bacteriology, Phonetics, Botany etc.», 1934)

Однако в отечественную практику этот тренд пришел значительно позднее. На илл. 16 для сравнения приве ден пример внешнего вида ауксанометра из 3 тома БСЭ 1950 г. Можно видеть, что он практически эквивалентен или даже упрощен по отношению к аппарату Пфеффе- ра. Однако точно такая же конструкция была неизменно воспроизведена впоследствии и в позднем издании - во 2 томе БСЭ за 1970 год, поскольку конструкция применявшихся в отечественной практике ауксанометров до последней четверти XX века фактически не отличалась от зарубежных прототипов начала века. Если еще в конце XIX века, когда подобные приборы в России называли авксанометрами, поставлявшиеся или конструировавшиеся по аналогии приборы оснащались циферблатами или метрическими шкалами (пример такого устройства с нижней циферблатной шкалой, заимствованный из 1-го тома Энциклопедического словаря Брокгауза и Ефрона за 1890 год, приведен на илл. 1в) , то впоследствии большинство описывавшихся в отечественных работах аппаратов не дотягивало по степени механизации и прецизионности до многих устаревших зарубежных приборов [19,20], являясь зачастую не ауксанографами, как дефинировались аппараты типа показнного на илл. 1в, а модифицированными рутинными ауксанометрами. И если к ряду первых микрометрических ауксанометров пристраивался горизонтально располагаемый микроскоп, то по отношению к упрощаемым модификациям его использование не было метрологически целесообразным, так как точность графической регистрации динамики роста на дуге диска или барабане с регистрирующей бумагой, достигаемая посредством использования ауксанометрического рычага, подобного рычажку Энгельмана, зачастую до сих пор использующемуся в распространенных в отечественной практике кимографах, не могла быть сопоставимой с точностью микрометрических измерений. Однако многие отечественные исследователи того времени предлагали модификации ауксанометров и конструировали ауксанометрические приборы на альтернативных принципах. Так, в 1920 гг.

русский эмигрант В. В . Лепешкин описал применимость ауксанометрии к Thallophytes в "Lehrbuch der Pflanzenphysiologie Auf Physikalisch-Chemischer Grundlage"[91], а советский биолог и основатель фитогормональной теории тропизмов Н.Г. Холодный разработал тип ауксанометра для анализа роли воды (то есть - роли тургора, гуттации и транспирации) в росте и тропизмах высших растений, названный им микро- потометром[31](этот прибор был участником ключевых экспериментов Н . Г. Холодного по воздействию растительных гормонов на тропизмы). Впоследствии Вент - второй создатель фитогормональной теории тропизмов, известной в настоящее время за рубежом как теория Вента-Холодного, также апеллировал к ауксанометрии в своей более поздней статье 1933 года[145].

Следует отметить, что впоследствии конструкции гидрометрических ауксанометров неоднократно использовались в ирригационно-лесоводческих и прикладных ботанических работах [43,133,87,105], связанных с гидратацией / дегидратацией и гуттацией растительных форм в природе, но, как правило, за редким исключением, ссылки на первую статью Холодного в них не встречаются. Иногда в качестве средового контроля в полевой ауксанометрии в подобных работах использовали лизиметры, что позволяло говорить о "корреляционной ауксанометрии", то есть о переходе от выявления цитофизиологических механизмов роста отдельного растения к эколого-климатическим и фенологическим методам мониторинга в масштабных полевых условиях, однако этот подход был слишком трудоемок для времен до внедрения компьютерных сетей сбора данных и поэтому не был внедрен в практику. В связи с этим временные масштабы ауксанометрических измерений до конца XX века были также относительно малы и позволяли наблюдать только рост, но не развитие растений, а также не могли быть использованы для анализа периодизации вегетации, фенологических фаз и стадий роста в корреляции с условиями внешней среды.

Меж тем, начиная с 1970-х гг. в работах, апеллирующих к ауксанометрии, постоянно увеличивался физиолого- экологический тренд на выявление реактивности роста к данным условиям среды. Это было связано с появлением расширенных возможностей измерений в этой среде за счет появления доступных датчиков и приборов регистрации физических и химических параметров. Так, в работе [125]был поставлен вопрос о субституировании (частичном) функций ауксинов стимуляцией ионами водорода (pH) и углекислым газом, концентрация которого, также, как и pH, характеризует редокс-баланс в геобиологических системах. В работе[71]произведен анализ механической реактивности и адаптивностной компенсации трибологического воздействия на рост проростка; обнаруженный механизм получил название "thigmomorphogenesis" . В работе[102]произведен сравнительный анализ непосредственного воздействия раствора кислоты и индуцирующего закисление плазмы клетки (за счет гиперсекреции Н+) синтетического агента - фузикокцина, дающего т . н. FC- индуцированное удлинение . Впоследствии появились дополнительные данные в пользу гипотезы о воздействии гормон-индуцированной модификации pH при клеточной стенке на кинетику роста[44]. Затем эти результаты были скоррелированы с данными о функции электрогенных ионных помп[77]; тем самым было в общем доказано единство процессов проведения электрического сигнала (биоэлектрогенеза) и роста / морфогенеза растений. Так как применение цейтрафферной регистрации[109]с тайм-кодом позволяло взаимно однозначно сопоставить каждому положению роста или тропизма проростка состояние того или иного физико-химического параметра, можно было составить комплексную картину мультипараметрической кинетики роста для каждого вида, сорта или породы древесных растений, но ввиду отсутствия доступной компьютерной аналитической техники на тот момент это не было сделано.

В 1990-х гг. на смену ауксанометрам устаревших конструкций пришли электронные системы с высоким временным разрешением - видеодигитайзеры[45]на базе цифровых ПЗС-камер [32,135] и прецизионные механоэлектрические измерители с использованием угловых преобразователей[34]. На конец 1 990-х - начало 2000-х приходится и развитие в высшей степени прогрессивного метода - лазерной интерференционной аук- санометрии [22,23] (впервые дуплексная лазерная оптическая система в ауксанометрии при разных параметрах pH и удельной электропроводности среды, осмотически воздействующей на клетки, была использована в 1 97 9 году[137]) . Уже в 1 9 90-х гг. целевая направленность установок и систем автоматизированной ауксанометрии сместилась к измерению роста в корреляции с условиями среды [47,69]. Новый ренессанс ауксано- метрии с применением расширенного компьютерного анализа изображений[132]позволяет взаимно однозначно сопоставлять (т.н. one-to-one mapping) зоны реактивности к различным факторам и зоны различной интенсивности роста в присутствии этих факторов, создавая тем самым новый мультимодальный подход к анализу ростовых данных.

В частности, можно производить спектрозональные колориметрические измерения поверхности растений, анализировать фурье-спектры изображений на предмет анизотропии, картировать усвоение излучения по изофотам и с помощью картирования градиента или ASCII- преобразования пиксельных данных, строить векторные поля динамики растений по технологии motion compensation. Таким образом, новый мощный инструмент отчасти способен заменить биохимические принципы анализа ростовых свойств, распространенные в 1980-1990- X [46,111,80], методами "неразрушающего контроля", функциональными и при мониторинге в режиме реального времени in vivo или in situ. Однако перекрыть необходимый критический диапазон средств биохимического анализа цифровая фотография, даже при расширении её динамического диапазона и спектрального диапазона до ультрафиолетовой и инфракрасной области, не в состоянии. В результате возникает опасность одностороннего анализа и односторонней же интерпретации физиолого- биохимических / биофизических данных, детерминированных дефицитом источников исходной информации .

Отклоняясь от темы, следует отметить, что особенно страдают унимодальностью и, как следствие, низкой репрезентативностью, отечественные и постсоветские работы по новым методам акусанометрии. Несмотря на появление первых русскоязычных статей по электронной ауксанометрии во второй половине 2000-е гг.[8], они еще весьма далеко отстоят от европейских и североамериканских разработок начала 1990-х. Не помогает при этом и т . н. "модернизация" или "реконструкция" ранних ауксанометрических аппаратов (напр., "Ауксанометр КТП" Лаборатории экспериментальной ботаники Новгородского университета), поскольку физические принципы измерения остаются прежними и часто изменяется только форма регистрации без конструктивной переработки и внедрения в его конструкцию новых датчиков. Даже о банальном соединении принципов цейттра- ферной съемки с анализом кинетики и механизмов сигнализации и с применением впоследствии методов молекулярной биологии (что характерно для зарубежных работ того же периода[16]), речь в отечественных публикациях не идет. Фактически размыта граница между учебными ауксанометрами, достаточными для студенческого практикума или школьной практики в классе с биологическим уклоном, и серьезными аналитическими установками, причем уклон имеет место в сторону упрощения исследовательской техники, а не синтеза новых прогрессивных конструкций, внедряемых в ВУЗы и школы, на базе прецизионной аналитической техники. Иными словами, как писалось в первой половине XX в . об одной из основательниц общедоступной эксперимен тальной ботаники Лилиан Кларк[33], "a time when science was still the Cinderella of the curriculum" (T . e., дословно: "время, когда наука являлась Золушкой образования")[143]. Эта ситуация требует категориального изменения. В противном случае неизбежно появление упрощенных, неполных по репрезентативности характеристических критериев моделей в статьях, апеллирующих к ауксанометрии как к верификационным данным[4].

2. Принципы нового ауксанометрического подхода

Из изложенного выше материала следует, что требуется разработка технологии или, корректнее, новой идеологии ауксанометрии, позволяющей объединить физиологический мониторинг, анализ наиболее характеристических биохимических данных, получаемых в ходе "неразрушающего контроля" (т.е., по определению, не препятствующих проведению эксперимента), измерения роста с временным разрешением и длительностью, достаточной для проведения фенологической периодизации и анализа стадийности развития растений. Переход от анализа роста (ауксанометрии) к анализу развития должен производиться при учете фенофаз, свойственных тем или иным породам, а в масштабах лесных сообществ и их лабораторных моделей, создаваемых в климатических камерах с учетом естественных метеорологоклиматических условий имитируемой местности, сопровождаться синтезом феноспектров, взаимно однозначно коррелирующих с биохимической спектроскопией / спектрометрией, регистрируемой с временным разрешением в соответствии c указанным выше комплексным подходом. Это очевидно, так как феноспектр, демонстрирующий, по Сукачеву и Гаме, переходы между фенофазами и стадии вегетации, цветения и т . д. вплоть до листопада, однозначно соответствует физиолого-биохимическим изменениям растения на этих стадиях, которые могут быть проанализированы вышеозначенным путем. Так как феноспектры древесных пород распространены в лесных хозяйствах СНГ и постсоветской России (там, где они еще сохранились), сделать дополнительно географическую привязку этих данных с геоботаническим картированием также не представляет серьезного труда.

Рассмотрим детально возможности предлагаемой феноспектральной ауксанометрии. Общеизвестно, что основными фенофазами растений считаются сокодвижение, появление листвы, цветение, плодоношение и листопад. Очевидно, что: сокодвижение сопровождают изменения интенсивности транспирации и изменения гидродинамических коэффициентов восходящего и нисходящего тока; появление листвы сопровождается фотосинтетической эмиссией кислорода и изменением эффективности транспирации вследствие увеличения функциональной удельной поверхности; цветение сопровождается эмиссией характерных с точки зрения химического анализа молекул ароматических структур, зависящих от фазы эмиссии, то есть от времени взятия пробы; эта эмиссионная характеристика изменяется в переходе к плодоношению (хотя первые ароматические профили можно регистрировать и на стадии появления листвы); листопад сопровождается эмиссией продуктов разложе ния листвы и пигментного распада и т.д. Все продукты и аддукты физиологической эмиссии химически определимы с использованием неразрушающих по отношению к растению - "эмиттеру" методов атмосферного спектрального анализа и газовой хроматографии среды.

Рассмотрим, что можно зарегистрировать с использованием газовой хроматографии и интерпретировать как характеристические детерминанты тех или иных стадий развития растений и модельных растительных сообществ.

Во-первых, речь, вполне очевидно, идет о газах. С точки зрения физиологической экологии лесных растений[85], представляющей собой кооперативное расширение общей физиологии лесных растений[86], эмиссия кислорода не является единственным "газохимическим" критерием для фитосообщества, так как следует учитывать экологические обратные связи, детерминирующие физиологию эмиссионного массива в целом. Так, в частности, сравнительно недавно было обнаружено, что растения различных климатических зон способны к метаногенезу[78], после чего во многих странах (в т . ч . и в России [6,5] ) развернулись исследования форм метаногенной активности древесных растений. Стало известно также, что растения способны к эмиссии NO в количествах, достаточных для измерения методами газовой хроматографии (GC) и газовой хромато- масс-спектрометрии (GC-MS)[7]. Кроме того, следует учитывать связи почва-лес в анализе газовой эмиссии, так как увеличение концентрации углекислого газа, понижающее регулирующий эффект растительности, вле чет увеличение эмиссии других парниковых газов (закиси азота и метана) из почвы [141,81,38], причем неблагоприятные по отношению к растениям климатические факторы стимулируют их собственную эмиссию парниковых газов[121]. В отличие от некоторых представителей фитопланктона[68], для которых увеличение концентрации углекислого газа влечет увеличение продуктивности, для лесных массивов этот принцип не действует, поэтому необходимо строго относиться к выявлению корректных обратных связей в физиологоэкологических процессах в лесном сообществе (для чего, в частности, можно использовать предлагаемый феноспектральный подход).

Во-вторых, речь идет о мониторинге транспирации. Это отчасти коррелирует с газодинамическим мониторингом, так как климатическая конвекция, регулирующая фазы осцилляций содержания углекислоты в атмосфере, регулирует также и температуру масс воздуха, что воздействует на испарение / транспирацию растений, с позиций гидравлики листа [14,103,21] . Элементный состав выделяемого при транспирации исследуется методами хроматографии как когда речь идет о транспирационных потоках на поверхности, так и когда речь идет о транспирации корней в конденсированной среде [101,108,95,96]. Идеализация при решении соответствующей модельной задачи in vitro в герметизированных условиях может быть в терминологии зарубежной газовой хроматографии означена как отношение между sample phase и headspace (gas phase), где роль headspace выполняет атмосфера или экспериментальная сре да климатической камеры, a sample phase жидкостная поверхность транспирации (по аналогии с[83]) . Поэтому, если создать герметичную климатическую камеру с подведенными каналами газового хроматографа и соответствующей ей системой забора газовых проб, то можно осуществить аналог "static headspace - gas chromatography" с временным разрешением в нативной среде. Это позволит одновременно анализировать транспирацию и изменения газового состава стандартизированной климатической среды, делая выводы об основных обменных процессах между биомассой растений и модельной окружающей средой c точки зрения физиологической экологии лесных насаждений[85].

В-третьих, газовая хроматография12, включая GC-MS и вышеуказанный Headspace Method, может быть использована для анализа и идентификации по компьютерным базам данных запахов, источаемых лесными растениями [72,64,146]. Как известно, лесные деревья и ярусные растения, входящие в поддерживающие их фитосообщества, производят эмиссию характерных ароматических веществ в достаточных для органолептического определения количествах как на стадии цветения, так и на стадии плодоношения [140,60,48]. Помимо их, деревья зачастую выделяют фитонциды[92], стандартно определяемые методами газовой хроматографии[3]. Фитонцидная активность эмиссии максимальна во время световой фазы фотосинтеза, а минимальна ночью - во время темновой, причем интенсивность генерации фитонцидов корреляционно связана с интенсивностью дыхания, температурой воздуха и проч. При этом, что характерно для предлагаемого метода в лесной практике, высшая активирующая деятельность фитонцидов свойственна лесам, а не городским насаждениям [93,94]. При определении летучих органических веществ в климатических камерах можно применять достаточно крупные по объемным характеристикам боксы, так как радиус действия тех же фитонцидов составляет 3-5 метров (по ингибированию микроорганизмов в микробиотестерах). Современные методы анализа и биопроцессинга запахов (см. напр., сб. [141,81]) позволяют определять достаточно тонкие композиции не в словарно-дефинитивном[39], а в точном аналитическом смысле, так как развитие технологий автоматического количественного определения запахов[147](в частности - постоянно совершенствуемых и уже внедренных в практику в ряде зарубежных организаций технологий типа "electronic nose" [117,73,126,40]) дает возможность не апеллировать к человеческому восприятию при классификации ароматов, определяемых машинным путем. Необходимость анализа запахов в фенологическом виде можно объяснить тем, что: микроклиматические и фенологические факторы воздействуют на химический состав их носителей[88], семиохимические характеристики растительных сигналов к насекомым-опылителям и функционально-обратных химически- отпугивающих факторов меняются в зависимости от времени[128], палинологические паттерны сезонов цветения у разных видов растений различны в зависимости от климатических факторов и географических параметров, определяющих фенологию данного вида или сообщества, а следовательно - и их одорологические характеристики меняются синхронно или же коррелятивно к первым[120].

Таким образом, машинный (то есть не субъективный одорологический, а корректный флейвохимический - хроматографический) анализ источников запаха растений неизбежен. Поскольку в исследовании эмиссии летучих соединений с лиственной поверхности часто применяют газовую хромато-масс-спектрометрию (GC-MS)[51], можно не ограничивать детектирование обычной газовой хроматографией13, а ставить на выходе вышеуказанной хромато-ауксанометрической установки масс- спектрометр, переходя тем самым от метода хромато- ауксанометрии к хромато-масс-ауксанометрии.

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

a

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

б

Илл. 3: Десорбционная ионизация распылением в элек трическом поле как способ анализа в режиме реального времени для исследования и химической систематизации цветения разных видов цветковых растений [фото: а) http://www.sciencedaily.com/ б) http://news.sciencemag.org/;]

В настоящее время уже существуют проекты «флейво- химического носа» для анализа цветочных запахов при атмосферном давлении на основе DESI-MS (десорбционный электроспрей или, что эквивалентно, десорбционная ионизация распылением в электрическом поле) в рамках подходов DART (Direct Analysis in Real Time - прямого анализа в режиме реального времени). Пример использования подобной системы для флейвохимического различения дан на илл. 3.

Так как фенология форм растений зависит от потоков углерода, влажности сред, суточного температурного диапазона и поверхностного энергетического баланса[61], необходимо сопоставлять в базах данных управляющего программного обеспечения установки данные хроматографии или хромато-масс-спектрометрии данным измерений параметров внешних сред, при которых производилось измерение в каждый момент времени мониторинга. Надо отметить, что частично на многие из этих параметров будет воздействовать и микрофауна, так как газообмен в фотосинтезе[54]противен газообмену в респирации микрофауны[100], что сказывается и на уровне их взаимодействия в рамках физиологической экологии[85]. Необходимо либо предусмотреть отсутствие микрофауны (беспозвоночных) в почве и на растениях в форме карантина проростков или саженцев на стадии их подготовки к экспериментальной работе / мониторингу, либо найти способы их экологофизиологического учета в математической модели, описывающей воздействие их молекулярной эмиссии на равновесие системы с учетом множественных обратных свя зей[131]. Вышеуказанные примеры абиотических и биотических факторов, способных вносить искажения в процесс наблюдения за описанной локализованной моделью лесоразведения, приводятся с целью демонстрации аэрохимической комплексности системы, следствием которой неизбежно является необходимость внедрения дополнительных способов анализа и сбора данных.

Как правило в компьютерной идентификации органических соединений используют не одну методику, а комплекс методов, определяющих и количественные, и качественные особенности исследуемого аналита с позиций различных молекулярных дескрипторов[139]в соответствии с измеримыми аппаратными методами характеристиками .

В отечественной практике рекомендуется не ограничиваться спектроскопическими методами, а применять также хроматографию и масс-спектрометрию при компьютерной идентификации по базам данных[1]. Поскольку в случае предлагаемой идеологии разработки / программирования установки система будет подавать сигналы в режиме реального времени, регулироваться и допускать определение комплексной параметрики через диагностику своего внутреннего состояния по всем источникам сигнала, речь идет, в сущности, о разработке экспертной химической системы[63]с функцией мультисенсорного синтеза потоков данных [106,59,124] и комплексной идентификации, соответствующей сбору сигналов с множества источников.

Так как издавна с ауксанометрами (начиная с 1930- X гг.), гибридизовали монохроматоры и спектрографы- монохроматоры14 [15], логично использование как дополнения к газовому хроматографу, как минимум, оптического спектрального анализа (что соответствует[90]). Так как, с позиций нелинейной физики экосистем[104], динамика экстремумов спектров во времени вегетации и при переходах от состояния к состоянию при чередовании фенофаз будет иметь нелинейный характер, соответствующий биофизической кинетике указанного процесса, а в большинстве самосогласованных моделей лесной динамики [18,26,119] имеется нелинейность и соответствующие ей обратные связи, очевидно, что идентификационные свойства экспериментального объема как динамической системы[70]интерпретируемы как параметры комплексной системной динамики[55]для нелинейной идентификации[112]процессов в комплексных сетях[12], каковыми являются экологические системы с позиций синтеза мультисенсорной информации (в частности - в системах дистанционного зондирования[90]). С позиций ММА-подхода (Mixed Methods Approaches - гибридизация отличных методов с целью верификации и установления фальсифицируемости каждого из них и общего массива данных, полученных с их помощью)[35], только сличение данных газовой хромато графии, оптической спектроскопии и климатического мониторинга может дать достаточно качественную и однозначную картину процессов, идущих в установке на различных уровнях энд(о)экологической и экзэкологи- ческой связности в ней, вследствие чего невозможно ставить вопрос об систематической идентификации и фингерпринтинге индивидуальных видовых фенофаз без обеспечения контролируемых условий среды. Так как в той же газовой хроматографии для решения таких сложных, неразрешимых в рамках обычных методических подходов, проблем используют ПО для хемометрики со сложным математическим анализом[36](т.н. многомерные методы - Multivariate Methods), причем многомерная хемометрика может быть соотнесена с методами определения структурных корреляций отдельных биохимических свойств[99]в рамках подхода QSAR (quantitative structure activity relationships), это актуально для идеологии конструирования настоящего типа установок, так как методы QSAR широко используются при моделировании отклика окружающей среды на внешние воздействия[113], причем давно созданы компьютерные методы подбора отклика по физическим свойствам молекулярных агентов[24].

Подход такого рода верен и в обратных задачах, вследствие чего можно использовать его и в ходе моделирования при мониторинге молекулярной эмиссии лесных растений и их сообществ (напр., в описываемой установке или установках типа БИОТРОН, ФИТОТРОН с системой сбора, адекватной описываемой для настоящей установки)15. Обычно мультимодальные и мультипара- метрические системы сбора дистанционной информации используются только в гибридизации с географическими информационными системами (GIS) для глобального мониторинга[127], однако для фитофизиологической прогонки лесных систем возможно отчасти заменить аппроксимацию глобальной динамики (с интерполяцией на достаточно локальные области) фитотронной прогонкой с мультипараметрической регистрацией при варьировании экспериментальных условий среды в установках / аппаратах, конструктивно подобных предлагаемым в настоящей работе (вплоть до апробации зимней регистрации витальных параметров при морозостойкой выгонке лесных пород[144]) в моделирующем соответствующие географические области искусственном микроклимате, индуцирующем соответствующие ему количественноопределимые фитофизиологические реакции16.

В мультипараметрических системах дистанционного зондирования, как правило, для детектирования растительности используют принципы гиперспектрального картирования [66,67] и лидарные методы, в частности - с использованием лазерной лидарной техники[62] (не считая ресурсоемких методов, требующих использования интерференционно-поляриметрической техники[89]), поэтому использование монохроматоров или лазерной техники сканирующего считывания в хромато- ауксиметрических установках для полной репрезентативности к GIS-прототипу логично совмещать со спектральным картированием поверхности растений.

Эта задача не является избыточной, так как известно, что в разных условиях среды спектрально- рефлектометрические характеристики могут иметь градиент даже у одного растения, что может быть обусловлено: различной доступностью излучения фотосинтетического диапазона листу и коррелирующим с этим изменением пигментной концентрации[56], изменением пигментного состава листа при биогенезе пластид в ходе перехода от пропластид к зрелым и, в дальнейшем, геронтопластам[17], стрессом листа[107](который, как указывалось ранее, приводит и к изменению молекулярной эмиссии газов растением), изменением содержания воды и соотношения воды и окисляемых форм в составе растения[37], градиентом содержания хлорофилла[30], различием стадийных форм растения и соответствующей этим формам дефинитивной структурой листа[130]до некральных изменений листа[118], сопровождающихся молекулярной газовой эмиссией в той мере, которая позволяет сопоставить отражательным спектрам листа хроматограммы или масс-спектры выделений, зарегистрированных "в линию" одновременно со спектрами отражения по многоканальной системе. Спектральное картирование можно производить в поточном порядке в режиме реального времени с использованием цифровых охлаждаемых (в идеальном случае; не обязательно) камер и дальнейшей математической обработки при параллельной классификации результатов на мэйнфреймах [28,29] c последующей 3D визуализацией[79].

При использовании многопроцессорных / многоядерных машин для обсчета данных ауксанометрической установки с гибридизацией физических принципов измерений можно использовать STATA/MP, так как этот пакет допускает не только обработку рядов динамики (временных рядов)[13], получаемых с установки, но и определение степени их правдоподобности[58], многомерное моделирование, соответствующее многофакторной стратегии сбора данных [122,123], а также выявление причинно-следственных связей при использовании структурных уравнений[9], не считая обычного регрессионного анализа[82]. Таким образом, к задачам распознавания образов спектров[129](и в частности - IR-спектров[148], так как допустима мультиспектральная / гиперспектральная съемка в ИК-диапазоне[142], способная демонстрировать тепловые свойства листвы в климатической камере), решаемым программным путем в рамках интерпретации данных спектрального мониторинга как паттернов, характеристических c точки зрения биоинформатики[115], в случае гиперспектральной фотографической регистрации добавляются задачи multispectral pattern recognition (см., напр., сб.[110]) во всех спектральных диапазонах в духе техники ISODATA[10], причем в динамике к ним ещё прибавляется новый уровень спектральных данных - продукт оконной спектральной обработки вариаций параметров фитофизиологии во временных циклах, обусловленных циркадными и фенологическими ритмами[134]. В таком случае, к обычным оптическим и пр. данным, получаемым в ходе дистанционного зондирования растительности в рамках стандартных физических принципов, реализуемых при невозможности фиксирования движущегося детектора на отдельных элементах флоры во время мониторинга[176], при стационарном расположении детекторов в ауксанометре прибавляется возможность анализа фенологической или феноспектральной динамики этих факторов и индикаторов физиологического отклика (к которой, собственно, и применяют методы нелинейного экологического анализа[134], в том числе в рамках физиологической экологии древесных растений[85]).

Таким образом, очевидно: гибридизация оптической, хроматографической и мультиспектральной фотографической информации требует весьма больших вычислительных ресурсов на выходе установки, однако результаты полновесной компьютерной обработки подобного рода полностью оправдываются предсказательными свойствами формируемой модели, способной быть использованной в ходе лесоразведения в прагматических целях. То есть, иными словами, вместо ауксанометрии как мониторинга прошедших коэффициентов роста (определимых также через конформные преобразования[2]морфометрическим путем) саженца / сеянца лесной породы, таки образом получаем качественную идентификацию фаз развития и многопараметрическую эквивалент-модель, обладающую предсказательной силой (на ограниченном временном промежутке), в том числе - для программируемых изменений параметризуемых свойств окружающей среды.

Заключение

Таким образом, предложена инновационная ауксаномет- рическая система, которая:

I. позволяет наблюдать за первичным ростом лесных пород в контексте развития за счет того, что индикатором динамики является не количественный (как в обычной ауксанометрии, где единственным критерием роста является удлинение проростка), а комплексно-качественный критерий, складывающийся из взаимно-однозначного сопоставления результатов аналитико-химического анализа молекулярной эмиссии растений и вариаций характеристик среды, что позволяет анализировать обратные связи роста / развития растения и деформаций параметрики внешней среды,
II. в ходе работы в различных режимах посредством обучения распознаванию образов с пополнением базы данных позволяет исследовать и моделировать не только один паттерн развития растения, свой- ственный некоторому стандартному пространству признаков, но и исследовать экспериментальный отклик экологической структуры признаков на изменение параметров среды, то есть переходить к фенологическому, модельно-биогеографическому, биометеорологическому, биоклиматологическому, эколого-физиологическому подходам по мере исследовательской необходимости (если таковое позволяют параметры биотрона, климатической камеры, оранжереи, в которых производится выгонка проростков лесных пород), занося спектральные и хроматографические данные в виде корреляционных паттернов в базы данных для последующего сличения,
III. при феноспектральной экспериментальной выгонке позволяет программировать и с помощью обратной связи регулировать температуру, четко прогнозируя подобным путем начало вегетации посредством суммирования эффективных температур или выявления их тренда, позволяющего реконструировать последовательность всхода или вегетации отдельных растительных форм в корреляции с характеристическими параметрами искусственного климата (если известно, например, что для клена Acer сумма эффективных температур - 156.2°С, а для липы Tilia - 739°С, то очевидно, что в термическом ранжировании в базе данных липа будет стоять позднее клена),
IV. автоматически классифицировать по комплексу характеристик на феноритмотипы или фенологические группы древесные растения в модельных фитосообществах по более шкалированной градации чем в устаревшей системе Морозовой, выделявшей только два феноритмотипа у древесных растений (вечнозеленые и листопадные),
V. позволяет работать в режиме регуляции параметрики климатической камеры путем регистрации обратной связи растений за счет использования детекторов и датчиков их молекулярной эмиссии в контролируемом физическом окружении, то есть, сами параметры, регистрируемые детектирующей частью установки могут представлять собой сигнал для изменения режима её функционирования.

Данная статья описывает не метод (так как рассматриваемая технология базируется на известной технике - такой как хроматография и спектроскопия), а подход, применение которого не ограничивается отдельными моделями или типами оборудования и системной сложностью условий среды.

Благодарности

Автор изъявляет благодарность сотрудникам Отдела метрологии средств измерений ГЕОХИ РАН и Лаборатории высокотемпературной кинетики и газовой динамики ИХФ РАН за доступ к технике в процессе написания работы. Выражается общая благодарность всем студентам- практикантам ИХФ РАН, участвовавшим в сборке установки, публикация материалов о которой с их участием предполагается в ближайшее время, а также коллегам из США и Китая, с которыми поддерживалась переписка на момент написания обзора.

Литература

1. Вершинин В.И., Дерендяев Б.Г., Лебедев К.С. Компьютерная идентификация органических соединений. М.: Академкнига, 2002. 197 с.

2. Градов О.В., Нотченко А.В. Полуавтоматическая дендрохронография для исследования морфогенеза и те- ратоморфозов на спилах высших растений // Лесотехнический журнал. 2012. №4(8). C. 47-57.

3. Дмитриев М. Т., Мищихин В.А., Степанов Е.В. Газохроматографическое определение фитонцидов в воздухе. Гигиена и санитария, М.:, Медицина, 1983. № 7. C. 43-45.

4. Михайленко И. М. Математическое моделирование роста растений на основе экспериментальных данных // Сельскохозяйственная биология, 2007. № 1. C. ЮЗ- 111.

5. Мухин В.А Воронин П. Ю . Метаногенная актив- ность в древесных растениях // Физиология растений , 2009. Т . 5 6.. С. 152-154 .

6. Мухин В.А Воронин П. Ю . Выделение метана из древесины живых деревьев // Физиология растений, 2011. Т . 58, № 2, С. 283-289.

7. Полесская О.Г. Растительная клетка и активные формы кислорода. М.:, Университет, 2007. 140 с.

8. Рассадина В.АПронская Е.БВершиловская И. ВЕгоров В.МАверина Н.Г. Электронная ауксано- метрия - новый способ регистрации ростовых реакций растений // Земляробства i ахова раслін: навукова- практычны часопіс, 2007. № 2. С. 19-20.

9. Acock A.C. Discovering Structural Equation Mod eling Using Stata. Stata Press, College Station, Texas, 2013. 304 p.

10. Ball G.H., Hall D.J. Isodata: a method of data analysis and pattern classification, Stanford Research Institute, Office of Naval Research. Information Sciences Branch, Menlo Park, California, 1965. 79 p.

11. Barnes C.R. A Registering Auxanometer // Botanical Gazette. 1887. Vol. 12, No. 7. P. 150-152.

12. Barrat A., Barthélemy M., Vesplgnanl A. Dy namical Processes on Complex Networks. Cambridge University Press, 2012. 361 p.

13. Becketti S. Introduction to Time Series using Stata. Stata Press, College Station, Texas, 2013. 741 p.

14. Beerling D.J., Franks P.J. Plant science: The hidden cost of transpiration // Nature. 2010. Vol. 464. P. 495-496.

15. Bergann F. Untersuchungen über Lichtwachstum, Lichtkrümmung und Lichtabfall bei Avena sativa mit Hilfe monochromatischen Lichtes // Planta. 1930. Vol. 10, No. 4, P. 666-743.

16. Binder B.M. Rapid Kinetic Analysis of Ethylene Growth Responses in Seedlings: New Insights into Ethylene Signal Transduction // Journal of Plant Growth Regulation. 2007. Vol. 26, No. 2. P. 131-142.

17. Biswal U.C., Biswal B., Raval M.K. Chloroplast Biogenesis: From Proplastid to Gerontoplast. Kluwer Academic, Dordrecht - Boston - London, 2003. 380 p.

18. Botkin D.B. Forest Dynamics: An Ecological Model. Oxford University Press, Oxford - New York, 1993. 328 p.

19. Bovie W.T. A Precision Auxanometer // Botanical Gazette. 1912. Vol. 53, No. 6. P. 504-509.

20. Bovie W.T. A Simplified Precision Auxanometer // American Journal of Botany. 1915. Vol. 2, No. 2. P. 95-99.

21. Brodribb T.J., Feild T.S. Leaf hydraulic evolution led a surge in leaf photosynthetic capacity during early angiosperm diversification // Ecology Letters. 2010. Vol. 13. P. 175-183.

22. Budagovskaya N.V., Guliaev V.I. Effect of calcium channel blocker on the growth dynamics of plants studied by laser interference auxanometry // Developments in Plant and Soil Sciences. 2002. Vol. 92. P. 204-205.

23. Budagovskaya N.V., Guliaev V.I. Rapid and Slow Response Reactions of Plants on Effect of Antioxidant Ambiol. In: Advanced Research on Plant Lipids (Proceedings of the 15th International Symposium on Plant Lipids). Springer, Dordrecht, 2003. P. 32332 6.

24. Bumble S. Computer Generated Physical Properties. CRC Press, Boca Raton, 1999. 288 p.

25. Bumpus H.C. A Simple and Inexpensive SelfRegistering Auxanometer // Botanical Gazette. 1887. Vol. 12, No. 7. P. 149-150.

26. Buongiorno J., Zhu S., Zhang D., Turner J., Tomberlin D. The Global Forest Products Model: Structure, Estimation, and Applications. Academic Press, Amsterdam - Boston - London - New York - Oxford - Paris - San Diego - San Francisco - Singapore - Sydney - Tokyo, 2003. 300 p.

27. Burgerstein A. Das pflanzenphysiologische In- stitut der K.K. Wiener Universitat von 1873-1884 // Österreichische botanische Zeitschrift. 1884. Vol. 34, No. 12. P. 418-422.

28. Chang C.-I. Hyperspectral Data Processing: Algorithm Design and Analysis. Wiley, Hoboken, 2013. 1164 p.

29. Chang C.-I. Hyperspectral Imaging: Techniques for Spectral Detection and Classification. Kluwer Academic - Plenum Publishers, New York, 2003. 367 p.

30. Chen J.-C., Chen C.-T. Correlation Analysis Between Indices of Tree Leaf Spectral Reflectance and Chlorophyll Content // The International Archives of the Photogrammetry, Remote Sensing and Spatial Information Sciences. Vol. XXXVII., Part B7. 2008. P. 231-238.

31. Cholodny N. Über das Wachstum des vertikal und horizontal orientierten Stengels in Zusammenhang mit der Frage nach der hormonalen Natur der Tropismen // Planta. 1929. Vol. 7, No. 5. P. 702-719.

32. Christian M., Lüthen H. New methods to analyze auxin-induced growth I: Classical auxinology goes Arabidopsis // Plant Growth Regulation. 2000. Vol. 32, No. 2-3. P. 107-114.

33. Clarke L.J. Botany As An Experimental Science - In Laboratory And Garden. Oxford University Press, Milton, 1935. 138 p.

34. Claussen M., Lüthe H., Blatt M., Böttger M. Auxin-induced growth and its linkage to potassium channels // Planta. 1997. Vol. 201, No. 2. P. 227234.

35. Creswell J.W. Research Design: Qualitative, Quantitative, and Mixed Methods Approaches. SAGE Publications Inc., Los Angeles - London - New Delhi - Singapore - Washington, 2013. 304 p.

36. Cserhati T. Multivariate Methods in Chromatog raphy: A Practical Guide. Wiley, Hoboken - Chichester, 2008. 352 p.

37. Dasgupta S. Remote Sensing of Vegetation Water and Fire Risk: Selected Research Topics. VDM, Saar- brücken, 2009. 176 p.

38. Davidson E.A., Keller M., Erickson H.E., Ver- chot L.V., Veldkamp E. Testing a conceptual model of soil emissions of nitrous and nitric oxides // BioScience. 2000. Vol. 50. P. 667-680.

39. De Rovira D. Dictionary of Flavors. Wiley- Blackwell, Ames, Iova, 2004. 736 p.

40. Degenhardt D.C., Greene J.K., Khalilian A. Temporal Dynamics and Electronic Nose Detection of Stink Bug-Induced Volatile Emissions from Cotton Bolls // Psyche. 2012, Vol. 2012. ID 236762. P. 1-9.

41. Drosos J.C., Viola-Rhenals M., Vivas-Reyes R. Quantitative structure-retention relationships of polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons gas-chromatographic retention indices // J. Chromatogr. A. 2010. Vol. 1217, No. 26. P. 4411-4421.

42. Du H., Wang J., Hu Z., Yao X. Quantitative Structure Retention relationship study of the constituents of saffron aroma in SPME-GC-MS based on the projection pursuit regression method // Ta- lanta. 2008. Vol. 77, No. 1. P. 360-365.

43. Engel H., Heimann M. Weitere Untersuchungen über periodische Guttation // Planta. 1949. Vol. 37, No. 3. P. 437-450.

44. Evans M.L., Mulkey T.J., Vesper M.J. Auxin action on proton influx in corn roots and its correlation with growth // Planta. 1980. Vol. 148, No. 5. P. 510-512.

45. Evans M.L., Ishikawa H., Estelle M.A. Responses of Arabidopsis roots to auxin studied with high temporal resolution: Comparison of wild type and auxin-response mutants // Planta. 1994. Vol. 194, No. 2. P. 215-222.

46. Evans M.L. Functions of Hormones at the Cellular Level of Organization // Encyclopedia of Plant Physiology. 1984. Vol. 10. P. 23-79.

47. Fernandez S.R., Wagner E. A New Method of Measurement and Analysis of the Stem Extension Growth Rate to Demonstrate Complete Synchronization of Chenopodium rubrum Plants by Environmental Conditions // Journal of Plant Physiology. 1994. Vol. 144, No. 3. P. 362-369.

48. Flavor and Health Benefits of Small Fruits (ACS Symposium Series). Ed. by M. Qian, A. Rimando. American Chemical Society, Washington, 2010. 336 p.

49. Flavor, Fragrance, and Odor Analysis. Ed. by R. Marsili. CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2011. 280 p.

50. Flavours and Fragrances: Chemistry, Bioproc essing and Sustainability. Ed. by R.G. Berger. Springer, Berlin - Heidelberg - New York, 2007. 664 p.

51. Fredrickson E.L., Estell R.E., Remmenga M.D. Volatile compounds on the leaf surface of intact and regrowth tarbush (Flourensia cernua DC) canopies // J. Chem. Ecol. 2007. Vol. 33, No. 10. P. 1867-1875.

52. Fritsch K. Akademien, Botanische Gesellschaf- ten, Vereine, Kongresse etc. // Österreichische botanische Zeitschrift. 1905. Vol. 55, No. 6. P. 245251.

53. Gas Enzymology. Ed. by H. Degn, R.P. Cox, H. Toftlund. Proceedings of a Symposium held at Odense University, Denmark, 1984. Kluwer Acad. Pub., Dordrecht, 1985. 264 p.

54. Geider R. Algal Photosynthesis: The Measurement of Algal Gas Exchange. Springer, 1992. 256 p.

55. Giantomassi A. Modeling estimation and iden tification of complex system dynamics: issues and solutions. Lambert Academic Publishing, Saarbrücken, 2012. 136 p.

56. Gitelson A.A., Gritz Y., Merzlyak M.N. Relationships between leaf chlorophyll content and spectral reflectance and algorithms for non-destructive chlorophyll assessment in higher plant leaves // Journ. Plant Physiol. 2003. Vol. 160. P. 271 -282.

57. Golden K.E. An Auxanometer for the Registration of Growth of Stems in Thickness // Botanical Gazette. 1894. Vol. 19, No. 3. P. 113-116.

58. Gould W., Pitblado J., Poi B. Maximum Likeli hood Estimation with Stata. Stata Press, College Station, Texas, 2010. 352 p.

59. Hall D.L. , McMullen S.A.H. Mathematical Tech niques in Multisensor Data Fusion. Artech House, Boston - London, 2004. 466 p.

60. Handbook of Fruit and Vegetable Flavors. Ed. by Y.H. Hui. Wiley, Hoboken, 2010. 1095 p.

61. Hanes J.M. Spring leaf phenology and the diurnal temperature range in a temperate maple forest // International Journal of Biometeorology. 2013. Vol. 58. No. 2. P. 103-108.

62. Helt M.F. Vegetation Identification With LI- DAR. Thes. Naval Postgraduate School. Monterey, California, 2005. 83 p.

63. Hemmer M.C. Expert Systems in Chemistry Research. CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2007. 416 p.

64. Heydanek M.G., McGorrin R.J. Gas chromatography-mass spectroscopy investigations on the flavor chemistry of oat groats // J. Agric. Food Chem. 1981. Vol. 29, No. 5. P. 950-954.

65. Hoffmann E.A., Fekete Z.A., Rajkó R., Palinkó I. , Körtvélyesi T. Theoretical characterization of gas-liquid chromatographic stationary phases with quantum chemical descriptors // Journ. Chromatogr. A. 2009. Vol. 1216, No. 12. P. 2540-2547.

66. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Tropical and Sub-Tropical Forests. Ed. by M. Kalacska, G.A. San- chez-Azofeifa. CRC Press, Boca Raton - London - New York, 2008. 352 p.

67. Hyperspectral Remote Sensing of Vegetation. Ed. by P.S. Thenkabail, J.G. Lyon, A. Huete. CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2011. 781 p.

68. Iglesias-Rodriguez M.D., Halloran P.RRickaby R.E.M., Hall I.R., Colmenero-Hidalgo E., Gittins J. R., Green D.R.H., Tyrrell T., Gibbs S.J., Dassow P., Rehm E., Armbrust E.V., Boessenkool K.P. Phytoplankton Calcification in a High-CO2 World // Science. 2008. Vol. 320. P. 336-340.

69. Inman-Bamber N.G. Automatic plant extension measurement in sugarcane in relation to temperature and soil moisture // Field Crops Research. 1995. Vol. 42, No. 2-3. P. 135-142.

70. Isermann R., Münchhof M. Identification of Dynamic Systems: An Introduction with Applications. Springer, Heidelberg - Dordrecht - London - New York, 2011. 730 p.

71. Jaffe M.J. Thigmomorphogenesis: The response of plant growth and development to mechanical stimulation // Planta. 1973. Vol. 114, No. 2. P. 143-157.

72. Jennings W. Qualitative Analysis of Flavor and Fragrance Volatiles by Glass Capillary Gas Chromatography. Academic Press, New York - London - Sydney - Toronto - San Francisco, 1980. 472 p.

73. Jin H.J., Lee S.H., Kim T.H., Park JSong H.S., Park T.H., Hong S. Nanovesicle-based bioelectronic nose platform mimicking human olfactory signal transduction // Biosensors and Bioelectronics, 2012. Vol. 35, No. 1. P. 335-341.

74. Jones. H.G. Plants and Microclimate: A Quanti tative Approach to Environmental Plant Physiology. Cambridge University Press, Cambridge - New York - Melbourne, 1992. 456 p.

75. Jones H.G., Vaughan R.A. Remote Sensing of Vegetation: Principles, Techniques, and Applications. Oxford University Press, Oxford - New York, 2010. 400 p.

76. Jönsson S., Eriksson L.A., van Bavel B. Multivariate characterization and quantitative structure- property relationship modeling of nitroaromatic compounds // Anal. Chim. Acta. 2008. Vol. 621, No. 2. P. 155-162.

77. Katou K., Ichino K. Effects of carbon dioxide on the spatially separate electrogenic ion pumps and the growth rate in the hypocotyl of Vigna sesqui- pedalis // Planta. 1982. Vol. 155, No. 6. P. 4 8 64 92.

78. Keppler F., Hamilton J.T., Brass M., Rockmann T. Methane emissions from terrestrial plants under aerobic conditions // Nature. 2006. Vol. 439. P. 187-191.

79. Kim K.S. 3D Visualization of an Invariant Dis play Strategy for Hyperspectral Imagery. Thes. Naval Postgraduate School, Monterey, California, 2002. 67 p.

80. Kim S.Y., Mulkey T.J. Effect of ethylene an tagonists on auxin-induced inhibition of intact primary root elongation in maize (Zeamays L.) // Jour nal of Plant Biology. 1997. Vol. 40, No. 4. P. 2562 60.

81. Knohl A., Veldkamp E. Global change: Indirect feedbacks to rising CO2 // Nature. 2011. Vol. 475. P. 177-178.

82. Kohler U., Kreuter F. Data Analysis Using Stata. Stata Press, College Station, Texas, 2012. 4 97 p.

83. Kolb B., Ettre L.S. Static Headspace-Gas Chromatography: Theory and Practice. Wiley, Hoboken, 2006. 350 p.

84. Kottek M., Grieser J., Beck C., Rudolf B., Ru- bel F. World Map of the Köppen-Geiger climate classification updated // Meteorol. Z.. 2006. Vol. 15, No. 3. P. 259-263.

85. Kozlowski T.T. The Physiological Ecology of Woody Plants. Academic Press, San Diego - New York - Boston - London - Sidney - Tokyo - Toronto, 1990. 678 p.

86. Kozlowski T.T., Pallardy S.G. Physiology of Woody Plants. Academic Press, San Diego - London - Boston - New York - Sidney - Tokyo -Toronto, 1996. 411 p.

87. Kunkel R., Gardner W.H. Potato tuber hydration and its effect on blackspot of Russet Burbank potatoes in the Columbia Basin of Washington // American Potato Journal. 1965. Vol. 42, No. 5. P. 109-124.

88. Lago J.H.G., Favero O.A., Romoff P. Microcli matic Factors and Phenology Influences in the Chemical Composition of the Essential Oils from Pitto- sporum undulatum Vent. Leaves // Journ. Braz. Chem. Soc. 2006. Vol. 17, No.7. P. 1334-1338.

89. Lavalle M. Remote Sensing of Vegetation by Po- larimetric Space Interferometers: Models and Methods. Lambert Academic Publishing, Saarbrücken, 2012. 220 p.

90. Lee M.J., Jeon S.W., Song W.K. Designation for an Ecological Network using Remote Sensing: Focusing on the North-East Asia. Lambert Academic Publishing, 2013. 64 p.

91. Lepeschkin W. Beschreibung und Erklarung der Wachstumserscheinun-gen. In: Lehrbuch der Pflanzen- physiologie Auf Physikalisch-Chemischer Grundlage. Verlag Von Julius Springer, Berlin, 1925, P. 1912 42.

92. Li Q., Nakadai A., Matsushima H., Miyazaki Y., Krensky A.M., Kawada T., Morimoto K. Phyton- cides (wood essential oils) induce human natural killer cell activity // Immunopharmacol. Immunotoxi- col. 2006. Vol. 28, No. 2. P. 319-333.

93. Li Q., Morimoto K., Kobayashi M., Inagaki H., Katsumata M., Hirata Y., Hirata K., Shimizu T., Li Y.J., Wakayama Y., Kawada T., Ohira T., Takayama N., Kagawa T., Miyazaki Y. A forest bathing trip increases human natural killer activity and expression of anti-cancer proteins in female subjects // Journ. Biol. Regul. Homeost. Agents. 2008. Vol. 22, No. 1. P. 45-55.

94. Li Q., Morimoto K., Kobayashi M. Inagaki H., Katsumata M., Hirata Y., Hirata K., Suzuki H., Li Y.J., Wakayama Y., Kawada T., Park B.J., Ohira T., Matsui N., Kagawa T., Miyazaki Y., Krensky A.M. Visiting a forest, but not a city, increases human natural killer activity and expression of anticancer proteins // Int. J. Immunopathol. Pharmacol. 2008. Vol. 21, No. 1. P. 117-127.

95. Liao Y.C., Chang Chien S.W., Wang M.C., Shen Y., Seshaiah K. Relationship between lead uptake by lettuce and water-soluble low-molecular-weight organic acids in rhizosphere as influenced by transpiration // J. Agric. Food Chem. 2007. Vol. 17, No. 55. P. 8640-8649.

96. Liao Y.C., Chien S.W., Wang M.C., Shen Y., Hung P.L., Das B. Effect of transpiration on Pb uptake by lettuce and on water soluble low molecular weight organic acids in rhizosphere // Chemos- phere. 2006. Vol. 65, No. 2. P. 343-351.

97. Literatur-Übersicht // Österreichische botanische Zeitschrift. 1907. Vol. 57, No. 2. P. 74-85.

98. Lloyd F.E. A New and Cheap Form of Auxanometer // Torreya. 1903. Vol. 3, No. 7. P. 97-100.

99. Mager P.P. Multivariate Chemometrics in QSAR: A Dialogue. Wiley, New York - Chichester - Toronto - Brisbane - Singapure, 1988, 345 p.

100. Maina J.N. The Gas Exchangers: Structure, Function, and Evolution of the Respiratory Processes. Springer, Berlin, 1998. 498 p.

101. Malone M., Herron M., Morales M.A. Continuous measurement of macronutrient ions in the transpiration stream of intact plants using the meadow spit- tlebug coupled with ion chromatography // Plant Physiology. 2002. Vol. 130, No. 3. P. 1436-1442.

102. McBride R., Evans M.L. Auxin inhibition of acid-and fusicoccin-induced elongation in lentil roots // Planta. 1977. Vol. 136, No. 2. P. 97-102.

103. McKown A.D., Cochard H., Sack L. Decoding leaf hydraulics with a spatially explicit model: principles of venation architecture and implications for its evolution // American Naturalist. 2010. Vol. 175. P. 447-460.

104. Meron E. Nonlinear Physics of Ecosystems. CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2013. 350 p.

105. Meyer W.S., Green G.C. Plant indicators of wheat and soybean crop water stress // Irrigation Science. 1981. Vol. 2, No. 3. P. 167-176.

106. Mitchell H.B. Multi-Sensor Data Fusion: An Introduction. Springer, Berlin, Heidelberg, 2010. 2 9 6 p.

107. Mohammed G.H., Noland T.L., Irving D., Sampson P.H., Zarco-Tejada P.J., Miller J.R. Natural and stress-induced effects on leaf spectral reflectance in Ontario species // Forest Research Report No. 156, 2000. 34 p.

108. Monje O., Bugbee B. Characterizing photosynthesis and transpiration of plant communities in controlled environments // Acta Hortic. 1996. Vol. 40. P. 123-128.

109. Mulkey T.J., Evans M.L., Kuzmanoff K.M. The kinetics of abscisic acid action on root growth and gravitropism // Planta. 1983. Vol. 157, No. 2. P. 150-157.

110. Multispectral Image Processing and Pattern Recognition (Series in Machine Perception and Artificial Intelligence, 44). Ed. by J. Shen, P.S.P. Wang, T. Zhang. World Scientific Pub. Co Inc., Singapore- New Jersey - London -Hong Kong, 2001. 130 p.

111. Mutaftschiev S., Prat R., Pierron M., Devilliers G., Goldberg R. Relationships between cell-wall (3-1,3-endoglucanase activity and auxin- induced elongation in mung bean hypocotyl segments // Protoplasma. 1997. Vol. 199, No. 1-2. P. 49-56.

112. Nelles O. Nonlinear System Identification: From Classical Approaches to Neural Networks and Fuzzy Models. Springer, Berlin - Heidelberg - New York, 2001. 785 p.

113. Nendza M. Structure-Activity Relationships in Environmental Sciences. Chapman and Hall, London, 1998. 288 p.

114. Nestler A. Das pflanzenphysiologische Insti- tut der k. k. deutschen Universitat in Prag // Ös- terreichische botanische Zeitschrift. 1909. Vol. 59, No. 2. P. 54-62.

115. Parida L. Pattern Discovery in Bioinformat ics: Theory & Algorithms. Chapman and Hall / CRC, Boca raton - London - New York, 2007. 512 p.

116. Peel M. C., Finlayson B. L., McMahon T. A. Updated world map of the Köppen-Geiger climate classification // Hydrol. Earth Syst. Sci. 2007. Vol. 11. P. 1633-1644.

117. Persaud K., Dodd G. Analysis of discrimination mechanisms in the mammalian olfactory system using a model nose // Nature. 1982. Vol. 299, No. 5881. P. 352-355.

118. Plant Cell Death Processes. Ed. by L.D. Nooden. Academic Press, Amsterdam - Boston - Heidelberg - London - New York - Oxford - Paris - San Diego - San Francisco - Singapore - Sydney - Tokyo, 2003. 392 p.

119. Pretzsch H. Forest Dynamics, Growth and Yield: From Measurement to Model. Springer, Heidelberg - Dordrecht - London - New York, 2010. 683 p.

120. Puc M., Kasprzyk I. The patterns of Corylus and Alnus pollen seasons and pollination periods in two Polish cities located in different climatic regions // Aerobiologia. 2013. Vol. 29, No. 4. P. 495-511.

121. Qaderi M.M., Reid D.M. Methane emissions from six crop species exposed to three components of global climate change: temperature, ultraviolet-B radiation and water stress // Physiologia Plantarum. 2009. Vol. 137, No. 2. P. 139-147.

122. Rabe-Hesketh S., Skrondal A. Multilevel and Longitudinal Modeling Using Stata, Vol.1. Stata Press, College Station, Texas, 2012. 497 p.

123. Rabe-Hesketh S., Skrondal A. Multilevel and Longitudinal Modeling Using Stata, Vol. 2. Stata Press, College Station, Texas, 2012. 477 p.

124. Raol J.R. Multi-Sensor Data Fusion with MATLAB. CRC Press, Boca Raton, 2009. 568 p.

125. Rayle D.L., Cleland R. Rapid Growth Responses in the Avena Coleoptile: A Comparison of the Action of Hydrogen Ions, CO2, and Auxin // Proceedings of the 7th International Conference on Plant Growth Substances / Australia, 1972. P. 44-51.

126. Röck F., Barsan N., Weimar U. Electronic Nose: Current Status and Future Trends // Chemical Reviews. 2008. Vol. 108, No. 2. P. 705-725.

127. Rodriguez-Bachiller A., Glasson J. Expert Systems and Geographic Information Systems for Impact Assessment. Taylor & Francis, London - New York, 2004. 408 p.

128. Schwarz J., Gries R., Hillier K., Vickers N., Gries G. Phenology of semiochemical-mediated host foraging by the western boxelder bug, Boisea rubrolineata, an aposematic seed predator // J. Chem. Ecol. 2009. Vol. 35, No. 1. P. 58-70.

129. Siddiqui K.J., Eastwood D.L., Liu Y-H. Spectral pattern recognition: the methodology // SPIE Proceedings. 1999. Vol. 3854. P. 84-97.

130. Sims D.A., Gamon J.A. Relationships between leaf pigment content and spectral reflectance across a wide range of species, leaf structures and developmental stages // Remote Sensing of Environment. 2002. Vol. 81. P. 337 - 354.

131. Skogestad S., Postlethwaite I. Multivariable Feedback Control: Analysis and Design. Wiley, Chichester - New York - Brisbane -Toronto - Singapore, 2005. 592 p.

132. Spalding E.P., Miller N.D. Image analysis is driving a renaissance in growth measurement // Current Opinion in Plant Biology. 2013. Vol. 16, No. 1. P. 100-104.

133. Sparks W.C. A review of abnormalities in the potato due to water uptake and translocation // American Potato Journal. 1958. Vol. 35, No 3. P. 430-436.

134. Spectral Theory And Nonlinear Analysis With Applications to Spatial Ecology. Ed. by Cano- Casanova S., Lopez-Gomez J., Mora-Corral C. World Scientific Pub. Co Inc., New Jersey - London - Singapore - Beijing - Shanghai - Hong Kong - Taipei - Chennai, 2005. 276 p.

135. Steffens B., Lüthen H. New methods to analyse auxin-induced growth II: The swelling reaction of protoplasts - a model system for the analysis of auxin signal transduction? // Plant Growth Regulation. 2000. Vol. 32, No. 2-3. P. 115-122.

136. Stone G.E. A Simple Self-Registering Auxanom- eter // Botanical Gazette. 1892. Vol. 17, No. 4. P. 105-107.

137. Taiz L., Métraux J.-P. The kinetics of bidirectional growth of stem sections from etiolated pea seedlings in response to acid, auxin and fusicoccin // Planta. 1979. Vol. 146, No. 2. P. 171-178.

138. Tan Y., Siebert K.J. Modeling bovine serum albumin binding of flavor compounds (alcohols, aldehydes, esters, and ketones) as a function of molecular properties // Journ. Food Sci. 2008. Vol. 73, No. 1. P. 56-63

139. Todeschini R., Consonni V. Molecular Descriptors for Chemoinformatics (Methods and Principles in Medicinal Chemistry). Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2009. 1257 p.

140. Tucker A.O., De Baggio T. The Encyclopedia of Herbs: A Comprehensive Reference to Herbs of Flavor and Fragrance. Timber Press, Portland - London, 2009. 604 p.

141. van Groenigen K.J., Osenberg C.W., Hungate B.A. Increased soil emissions of potent greenhouse gases under increased atmospheric CO2 // Nature. 2011. Vol. 475. P. 214-216.

142. Vollmer M., Möllmann K.-P. Infrared Thermal Imaging: Fundamentals, Research and Applications. Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 2010. 612 p.

143. W.E.B. Botany as an Experimental Science in Laboratory and Garden // Nature. 1935. Vol. 136. P. 8 90.

144. Warnock C. Backyard Winter Gardening: Vegetables Fresh and Simple, In Any Climate without Artificial Heat or Electricity the Way It's Been Done for 2,000 Years. Cedar Fort, Inc. Springville, 2013. 176 p.

145. Went F.A.F.C. Die Bedeutung des Wuchsstoffes (Auxin) für Wachstum, photo- und geotropische Krüm- mungen // Naturwissenschaften. 1933. Vol. 21, No. 1. P. 1-7.

146. Werkhoff P., Guntert M., Krammer G., Sommer H., Kaulen J. Vacuum Headspace Method in Aroma Research: Flavor Chemistry of Yellow Passion Fruits // J. Agric. Food Chem. 1998. Vol. 46. P. 1076-1093.

147. Wise P.M., Olsson M.J., Cain W.S. Quantification of Odor Quality // Chemical Senses. 2000. Vol. 25, No. 4. P. 429-443.

148. Zachor A.S. Spectral pattern recognition in IR remote sensing // Applied Optics. 1983. Vol. 22, No. 17. P. 2699-2703.

1 Note that the methods utilizing auxanographs are also referred to as auxanometry rather than auxanography, since auxanography in biology refers to the biochemical methods in microbiology associated with the use of auxotrophic mutants when assessing the effects of various preparations or determining optimal growth media for cultivation of microorganisms.

2 Recollect also the Bovie precision auxanometer (Fig. 2a, b) and Harcourt students auxanometer (Fig. 2c) of the 1920s as well as botanical recording lever, still manufactured in the 1930s, which could be used not only in the initial mechanical variant, but also (given an inductance coil or a tube recorder) with a radio electronic recording, which experimenters frequently put to use (Fig. 2d).

3 A considerably expanded variant of the Brockhaus Enzyk- lopadie, founded by Friedrich Arnold Brockhaus, German encyclopedist, characterized in the Encyclopaedia Britannica (1911) as "No work of reference has been more useful and successful, or more frequently copied, imitated, and translated, than that known as the Conversations- Lexikon of Brockhaus".

4 This device was designed and produced at the Institute of Biophysics and Cell Engineering, National Academy of Sciences of Belarus, and the Design Office Pribor. However, this is not an auxanometer but rather a phytomonitor, well designed for its time (the end of the last century), intended according to the presentation of its authors for several specialized tasks. Among these tasks are comparative assessment of soil phytotoxicity and fertility; biotesting of natural and waste waters; air pollution assessment; certification tests of plant protection chemicals; control and testing of chemical and bacterial preparations regulating growth and development of agricultural plants; and breeding focused on the search for the traits determining yield, earliness, and resistance to diseases, drought, low temperatures, herbicides, and so on. As for the basic research into the patterns of plant growth, the major purpose of auxanometers, this is the last to be mentioned (http://ibp.org.by/ru/wp- content/uploads/2011/12/electronic-auxanometer.pdf). Therefore, this device is incomparable with standard electronic auxanometers known since the 1970s (Hari, Kan- ninen, Hari 1978, Courtney, Wilkinson 1978)

5 Sorbent tubes for sampling volatile organic compounds and a thermal desorber are most appropriate for this purpose when using a field and laboratory emission cell (FLEC) or the input from a climate chamber in the case of laboratory realization.

6 This is possible owing to specialized libraries in a format of computer databases suitable for both GC-FID and GC-MS data. Examples are Shimadzu FFNSC library (the GC data for it were provided by Prof. Mondello group, University of Messina, Italy) and GC/FID & GC/MS RTL Flavor Databases by Agilent Technologies (utilizing GC/MSD ChemSta- tion G1701CA software with RTL and Screener; http://www.chem.agilent.com/Library/slidepresentation/Publ ic/Flavors RTL Databases.pdf).

7 Although most biochemical samples and agents belong to soft condensed matter, gas biochemical studies should not be regarded in the proposed method as an exotic tool: as long ago as the 1980s, such studies were performed and meetings in this field were organized (in particular, the Symposium on Gas Enzymology - see all materials of that symposium in: "Gas Enzymology" Symp. Proc. at Odense University, Denmark-1984 (Ed. by: H. Degn, R.P. Cox, H. Toft- lund). Kluwer Acad. Pub., Dordrecht, 1985. 264 p).

8 This may be also combined with laser auxanometry, utilizing monochromatic (by definition) laser radiation (Buda- govskaya & Guliaev 2002, 2003)

9 Note that QSAR has been widely used in automated interpretation of gas chromatography data for aromatic compounds (Jönsson et al. 2008, Drosos et al. 2010) and the constituents of plant aroma compositions (Du et al. 2008, Tan & Siebert 2008). That is why the use of QSAR approach in flavor chemical fingerprinting of forest ecosystems and their models has solid grounds. On the other hand, quantum chemical descriptors for GLPC have been theoretically grounded (Hoffmann et al., 2009), allowing QSAR principles to be also applied to simple gases involved in photosynthesis and respiration.

10 This looks especially fitting for modeling of the forest management in the Russian Federation for the following reasons. According to the Köppen climate classification (Kottek et al. 2006, Peel 2007), the major part of the Russian Federation belongs to Dw and Df subarctic zones with prevalence of Dfc and Dfd (here, c stands for the lower temperature range of -25 to -10°C and d, for the range of -40 to -25°C, which some notations interpret as painfully cold).

11 Тем не менее, методы регистрации с использованием ауксанографов также называются ауксанометрией, а не ауксанографией, так как ауксанографией в биологии называют биохимические методы в микробиологии, связанные с использованием ауксотрофных мутантов при определении действия различных препаратов или выявлении оптимальных сред для культивации микроорганизмов .

12 Это целесообразно осуществлять с использованием сорбционных трубок для сбора летучих органических веществ и термодесорбера при отборе ячейкой FLEC (Field and Laboratory Emission Cell) или, что логично в случае лабораторной прогонки метода - любыми методами с подачей из климатической камеры.

13 Газово-биохимические исследования, несмотря на очевидное отнесение большинства биохимических агентов к частично упорядоченным, жидким и конденсированным средам, не должны рассматриваться в данном методе как экзотика, поскольку еще в 1980-е годы за рубежом проводились работы газовобиохимической направленности и конференции по различным подобластям этой направленности (напр., в частности - газовой энзимологии[53]).

14 Это можно связать также с методами лазерной ауксиметрии при использовании монохроматического (по определению) лазерного излучения [22,23].

15 Надо отметить, что QSAR плотно вошел в практику автоматизированной интерпретации данных газовой хроматографии ароматических соединений [41,76] и соединений, входящих в ароматические композиции растений [42,138], поэтому ис пользование QSAR-подхода во флейвохимическом фингерприн- тинге лесных экосистем и их моделей в описываемой установке имеет веские основания к применению. В то же время, в теоретической химии существуют работы по квантовохимическим дескрипторам в GLPC[65], что дает возможность для простых газов, используемых в фотосинтезе и дыхании, также использовать идеи QSASR.

16 Это может быть особенно применимо для моделирования лесного хозяйства РФ, так как, в соответствии с климатической классификацией по Кёппену [84,116], большая часть РФ относится к зонам субарктической принадлежности Dw и Df c преобладанием Dfc и Dfd, где индекс "с" означает минорный температурный диапазон от -25 до -10 °C, а индекс "d" - от -40 до -25 °С (в ряде нотаций читающийся как "мучительно холодно").

106 of 106 pages

Details

Title
A Novel Tool for Monitoring of Forest Plant Growth and Development Stages. Complexation of Spectroscopy, Gas Chromatography and Direct Mass Spectrometry
College
Moscow State Pedagogical University  (Inst. Biol. Chem.)
Author
Year
2014
Pages
106
Catalog Number
V454504
ISBN (Book)
9783668874473
Language
English
Tags
novel, tool, monitoring, forest, plant, growth, development, stages, complexation, spectroscopy, chromatography, direct, mass, spectrometry
Quote paper
Oleg Gradov (Author), 2014, A Novel Tool for Monitoring of Forest Plant Growth and Development Stages. Complexation of Spectroscopy, Gas Chromatography and Direct Mass Spectrometry, Munich, GRIN Verlag, https://www.grin.com/document/454504

Comments

  • No comments yet.
Read the ebook
Title: A Novel Tool for Monitoring of Forest Plant Growth and Development Stages. Complexation of Spectroscopy, Gas Chromatography and Direct Mass Spectrometry


Upload papers

Your term paper / thesis:

- Publication as eBook and book
- High royalties for the sales
- Completely free - with ISBN
- It only takes five minutes
- Every paper finds readers

Publish now - it's free