The Influence of Motivation on Workers of the Ghana Commercial Bank Limited

A Case Study of GCB LTD


Academic Paper, 2014
35 Pages

Free online reading

TABLE OF CONTENTS

ABSTRACT

TABLE OF CONTENTS

CHAPTER FOUR
DATA PRESENYTATION, ANALYSIS AND DISCUSSION
4.0 Introduction
4.1 Sex of respondents
4.2 Responsibility groupings
4.3 Number of years working at the banks
4.4 Educational background of respondents
4.5 Influence of Boss Over Subordinates
4.6 Incentives
4.7 Freedom to make own decision
4.8: Opportunity for Further Training
4.9: Preference for Job other than Ghana Commercial Bank Ltd

CHAPTER FIVE
SUMMARY OF FINDINGS, CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS
5.0 Summary of Findings
5.1 Conclusion
5.2 Recommendations

APPENDIX A

APPENDIX B

APPENDIX C

BIBLIOGRAPHY

ABSTRACT

This research was on “the effect of motivation on workers at Ghana Commercial Bank ltd.” The research work was aimed at measuring the effect of the current motivation with regards to workers performances in the institution.

Primary and secondary data were used in answering the research problems in respect to the research topic. Also interview and questionnaire were used as instruments for data collection.

From the findings of the study, it was revealed that workers in Ghana Commercial Bank Ltd. are not motivated well; this has resulted in the workers not given up their best in the work place and wish for the change of organization.

The researcher also made some recommendations to help solve the problem.

CHAPTER FOUR

DATA PRESENYTATION, ANALYSIS AND DISCUSSION

4.0 Introduction

In all, twenty-five (25) questionnaires were distributed, but a total of twenty (20) were duly completed and collected for analysis, which represents 80 percent of the questionnaires distributed. Findings are represented in Tables and analyzed in relation to the theories of motivation.

4.1 Sex of respondents

The table below shows the sex ratio of respondents of the study.

Table 4.1: Sex of Respondents

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Source: field survey, 2011

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Frequency 4.1: Sex of Respondents

Table 4.1 and Figure 4.1 above show the number and percentage of workers who completed the questionnaires. Out of the twenty respondents who completed the questionnaires fifteen (15) were male representing 75% and Five (5) female representing 25% of the total.

4.2 Responsibility groupings

The table below shows the number of respondents based on their responsibility in the banks.

Table 2: Responsibility Group

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Sources: field survey

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Figure 4.2: Responsibility of Respondents

Table 4.2 and Figure 4.2 show the various groups of workers who responded to the questionnaires distributed. From the above data, ten Operations Managers representing 50% recorded the highest group of respondents, followed by three Officers representing 15%, Clerks, Cleaners and Security personnel which made up of two respondents from each group represented 10% each of the total respondents while one Retail Manager respond represented just 5% in all.

4.3 Number of years working at the banks

The table below indicates the respondents and the number of years they have served

Table 4.3: Number of Years Worked

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Sources: field survey, 2011

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Figure 4.3: Number of Years Worked

Table 4.3 and figure 4.3 represent the number of years worked in Ghana Commercial Bank Ltd. – Wenchi and Techiman Zone. From the above data it can be deduced that most of the respondents were within the range of 6 – 10 years, followed by 11 – 15 years and then 1 – years with 21 and above years the least.

4.4 Educational background of respondents

Table 4.4: Educational Background of Respondents

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Sources: field survey, 2011

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Fig. 4.4: Educational Background of respondents

Table 4.4 and figure 4.4 indicates that five persons 25% of the respondents were holders of General Certificate of Education Advance Level and that of Diploma respectively whiles four persons representing 20% had Middle School Leaving Certificate with General Certificate of Education (O/L) and Degree and above holders made up of three persons represented 15% of the total respondents each.

Table 4.5: Working Under Boss

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Sources: field survey, 2011

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Table 4.5: Working Under Boss

The study was to find out whether the respondent works under a boss. Hence from table 4.5 and figure 4.5, it is clear that 75% of the respondents have bosses whilst 25% do not have boss.

Table 4.6: Influence of Boss Over Subordinates

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Sources: Field survey, 2011

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4.5 Influence of Boss Over Subordinates

Another objective of the study was to find out whether bosses have influence over subordinates at the work place or not. It can be deduced from table 4.6 and figure 4.6 that various bosses have influence over the work of the respondents. Eighty (80%) of the respondents said bosses influence their work: while 20% said their bosses do not influence their work in any way. These results show a positive motivation. This can be deduced from Douglas M. McGregor’s theory X. this theory asserts that the average human beings is self-centered, dislikes change and is unconcerned with needs of the organization. Because of these traits, managers have to persuade, coerce reward or punish workers in order to achieve organizational goals. People cannot be trusted to work effectively without active and constant supervision.

4.6 Incentives

As part of the objectives of the study to find out whether respondents are given incentives apart from their salaries. In table 4.7 and figure 4.7, it shows that 40% of the respondents get other incentives or rewards apart from their salaries. The other percentage, which said

They get incentives apart from their salaries, named some as traveling allowances and overtime [payment. 60% of the respondents admitted that they do not get any incentives or rewards from the work apart from the basic salary. This state of affair indicates a poor motivation in the work place and therefore needs attention.

The above ascertain is taken from the Economic Man theory of motivation, which is based on the premises that man is motivated primarily for money: he is inherently helpless and lazy: he will response only when he is bribed by financial rewards. Thus the low level of incentives to the workers in the department means that the workers are put in a situation that does not motivate them to get up their best in the pursuance of their duties.

Table 4.6: Incentives

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Sources: Field survey, 2011

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4.7 Freedom to make own decision

The respondents were asked whether they are given freedom to make their own decisions. Table 4.8 and figure 4.8 show the response as to whether workers are free to make decisions about their work. 30% of the respondents from the above data said they are free to do so while 70% said they are not free to make decision about their work. This indicates that a greater percentage of the workers are not free to make their decision about the work they are dong. And that also means a negative incentive of recognition which does not boost morale of workers. Contribution of workers is not recognized. It is generally agreed from Hertzberg’s two factors theory of motivation that, the worker need to have his efforts recognized by his supervisors, failure to achieve self-esteem within the social or work group often leads to a sense of inferiority and lowering of morale.

One of the most frequently cited reasons for job dissatisfaction is an adverse conception of the independence and control provided by the work situation. So long as individual desires independence in decision making, the more authoritarian the supervisory practice, the greater the dissatisfaction arouse and the greater the pressure to withdraw from the organization. Again, people with little influence on decision had a higher probability of resigning from an organization than those resign with greater influence in the decision making process.

Table 4.7: Freedom to Make Own Decision

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Sources: field survey, 2011

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4.8: Opportunity for Further Training

Respondents were asked to whether there are opportunities for further training. Table 4.9 and figure 4.9 above show the workers response towards workers opportunity for further training. 55 percent responded that there are opportunities for them to improve up on their present skill or knowledge levels whilst 45 percent said they have chance to further their education to improve their present level of education.

Providing opportunities for organizations employee to go for further studies, workshops and seminars gives employees an additional knowledge to what they already have. It should be encouraged where it is practiced.

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

Sources: field survey, 2011

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4.9: Preference for Job other than Ghana Commercial Bank Ltd.

The study was also to find out whether respondents preferred jobs outside the organization (Ghana Commercial Bank Ltd. – Wenchi and Techiman banches). Table 4.10 and figure 4.10 show the respond of workers on their preference of job outside the Ghana Commercial Bank Ltd. – Wenchi and Techiman Zone. 65 percent said they would prefer working on another palace if they get the chance whilst 35 percent want to remain in the department.

When asked about why they preferred working elsewhere, some stated that they want to change environment and seek better service whiles some also complained about pay scheme in the Civil Service.

According to the literature on factors associated with employee motivation to leave an organization, it suggests that the primary factor influencing this motivation is the employee satisfaction with the job as defined by him/her. The greater the individual satisfaction with the job, the less perceived desirability of movement.

High labor turnover thus implies that employees are not satisfied with the job to make them stay. This state of affairs has very big negative consequences on corporate objectives.

Table 4.10: Preference for Job Outside Ghana Commercial Bank Ltd.

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Sources: field survey

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4.10: Remuneration for Extra Work

The study was also to find out whether respondents were given remuneration for extra work done. Table 4.11 and figure 4.11 show the respond of workers on their remuneration for extra work in Ghana Commercial Bank Ltd., 15% said they receive remuneration for extra work while 85% said they do not receive remuneration for extra work done.

Table 4.10: Remuneration for Extra Work

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Sources: field survey, 2011

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4.11. Promotion Regularity

From table 4.12 and figure 4.12, it can be deduced that promotion of workers in the department has been regular. When this question was asked, 80 percent answered Yes and the remaining 20 percent said No.

From this, one can say that there is a good motivational sign as workers would feel fine and the remaining 20 percent said No. From this, one can say that there is a good motivational sign as workers would feel fine and the resultant effects been the increase in performance. The above ascertain can be deduced from Hertzberg’s two factors theory of motivation on self-satisfaction. It states that actual or promised promotion is a positive motivation therefore must be encouraged by managers in all levels.

Table 4.11: Promotion Regularity

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Sources: field survey, 2011

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CHAPTER FIVE

SUMMARY OF FINDINGS, CONCLUSION AND RECOMMENDATIONS

5.0 Summary of Findings

The main objective of the research was to find out the level of motivation of workers of financial institutions in Ghana using Ghana Commercial Bank Ltd. - Wenchi and Techiman Zone, as the case study.

The research was carried out on this topic because, motivation of workers play a vital role in achieving corporate objectives.

During the study, out of the 25 workers who were targeted at the Ghana Commercial Bank Ltd. - Wenchi and Techiman Zone to respond to the questionnaires distributed to them, 20 of them completed the questionnaire successfully.

Those who responded fell under the categories among which included Retail Manager, Operations Managers, Officers, Clerks, Cleaners and Security Officers.

During the study, it was realized that out of these 20 people who responded successfully, maximum of 9 had worked within the period of 6 – 10 years. Hence, the numbers who have so far spent the highest number of years at the Ghana Commercial Bank Ltd. - Wenchi and Techiman Zone are only 2 workers with the maximum years of 21.

It was realized from the study that, out of the 20 respondents ten (10) of them were holders of General Certificates of Education (A/L) and Diploma being the highest. With General Certificate of Education (O/L), Degree and above registering the minimum of six, showing that the service of the middle level manpower is much considered at the Ghana Commercial Bank Ltd.

During the data presentation, analysis and discussion of the study, it was deduced that about 80% of the respondents admitted that, their Bosses had influence over their work assigned to them, showing positive motivation according to Douglas M. McGregor’s Theory X.

Incentive is another factor that plays a vital role in the motivation process in every organization. The findings realized during the study reveals that, 15 persons representing 60% of the respondents do not attract any reward in a form of incentives in the institution. The 10 persons representing 40% who receive some incentives even said it was not sufficient.

In attempt to find out whether or not the respondents were given freedom to make their own decisions. From the data analyzed in chapter four, it can be seen that only 30% out of the 100% were at liberty to make their own decision. This statistics shows how poor decision making process is at the Ghana Commercial Bank Ltd.

With the issue of further training, the data in chapter four, show that 55% of the respondents admitted positively that chances are being given to them to further their studies showing positive encouragement for workers to improve upon their knowledge and skills.

One of the main objectives of the study was to find out whether workers at the Ghana Commercial Bank Ltd. were satisfied with the condition of service at their work place. From the data presented and analyzed in chapter four, it was realized that conditions of service were quite poor. This is backed by the data taking during field survey, which shows that 65% of the respondents are ready to leave the job provided other better jobs are secured elsewhere. This is a clear manifestation of poor motivation in the Ghana Commercial Bank Ltd.

In a nutshell, if employees feel that an organization’s investment in them is significant and continuous, they will enjoy a greater sense of job security, the organization will be more likely to retain a source in which it has a major investment. An organization will benefit more greatly not only by satisfying these motivators but also by gaining a more simultaneously downsizing and hiring of employees despite its potentially adverse effect on performance and productivity of the organization as a whole.

5.1 Conclusion

From the findings of this study which is analyzed in Chapter Four, it can be concluded that: Workers in Ghana Commercial Bank Ltd. are not motivated well: due to this most workers will prefer to work elsewhere if they get the opportunity.

Most workers do not get incentives from the organization apart from their basic salary. This has resulted in the workers not given up their best in the work place and wish for the change of organization.

Majority of the workers are not allowed to make decisions concerning their work. Because, decisions are made by the superiors, it brings negative incentives, inferior feeling in the part of the employees as well as well low morale that brings nothing but low productivity.

There is a positive relationship among motivation and productivity or work performance. That is the level of motivation: productivity or work performance depends on each other. The higher the level of productivity the higher the level of motivation and the vice-versa.

Due to the low level of motivation in the organization, productivity is low as well.

5.2 Recommendations

From the findings revealed in this research, the researcher therefore recommends the following;

1 There should be a clear basis for promotion (where applicable) and it should be regular. Stating the experience and the level of experience required to be promoted can do this.
2 Authorities in the management should negotiate for increment in the financial allocation to the bank to meet maintenance and workers welfare cost. This can be done by preparing a comprehensive budget that will take into accounts all the financial needs of the bank for a period of time.
3 There should be an attractive incentive scheme for all categories of workers. Workers who work more than normal working hours should be adequately rewarded to encourage them to do more.
4 There should be free flow of information at all levels of the department’s administration by adopting the participatory model of administration. This can allow employee to take part in the organization’s administrative process.
5 Non-Financial positive incentives such as regular promotion, appreciation of work and opportunities for further studies should be emphasized. When these schemes are put in place, workers will put up their maximum to get recognition from management and will be more willing to stay in the organization than before. Non-Administrative staff should be recognized. When this is done, then all categories of workers will feel happy to belong to the company.
6 Accommodation and health care needs of the employees in the organization should be catered for. Where possible allowances should be given to those occupying their own houses and refund made to employees who have received medical treatment.
7 The department should institute career planning and development through effective management, to ensure that desired competencies exist in the current and future work force to enable the department to re-assign rather than replace talent in future.

APPENDIX A

I would be happy if you could genuinely respond to the questionnaire.

It’s a case study to know the effects of motivation on workers in the Ghana Commercial Bank branches of Wenchi and Techiman.

The data that will be taken will be treated strictly confidential.

1. Sex: Male { } Female { }

2 Your occupation
(a) Retail Manager { } (b) Operations Manager { } (c) Officer { }
(d) Clerk { } (e) Secretary { } (f) Cleaner { }
(g) Security Officer{ } (h) Other(specify) { }

3 Your Grade where applicable: ….

4 For how long have you been in this Department? ..

5 Educational attainments (Tick the Highest)
(a) Never been to school { } (b) Middle School Certificate { }
(c) General Certificate of education (‘O” Level) { }
(d) General Certificate of education (‘A” Level) { }
(e) Certificate ‘A’ three or four years { }
(f) Diploma { } (g) Degree { } (h) Others (specify) …

APPENDIX B

I would be happy if you could genuinely respond to the questionnaire. It’s a case study to know the effects of motivation on workers in the Ghana Commercial Bank branches of Wenchi and Techiman.

The data that will be taken will be treated strictly confidential.

1. Do you work under a boss? (a) Yes { } (b) No { }

2. If yes does he/she influence your attitude towards your work?
(a) Yes { } (b) No { }

3 How does he/she influence your work?

4 Give reasons for your answer .

5 Has your answer in ‘a’ above affected your performance? (a) Yes { } (b) No { }

6 Does your job attract any incentive or rewards apart from your salary?

7 If yes have the freedom to make decisions about your work? (a) Yes { } (b) No { }

8 Do you have the freedom to make decision about your work? (a) Yes { } (b) No { }

APPENDIX C

I would be happy if you could genuinely respond to the questionnaire.

It’s a case study to know the effects of motivation on workers in the Ghana Commercial Bank branches of Wenchi and Techiman.

The data that will be taken will be treated strictly confidential.

1. When you do extra hours at work, are you remunerated or given incentive for that? (a) Yes { } (b) No { }

If No why?

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2 What problem(s) do you encounter in your occupation?

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3 How do you think the problem(s) can be solved?

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Thank you.

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35 of 35 pages

Details

Title
The Influence of Motivation on Workers of the Ghana Commercial Bank Limited
Subtitle
A Case Study of GCB LTD
Author
Year
2014
Pages
35
Catalog Number
V469601
Language
English
Tags
influence, motivation, workers, ghana, commercial, bank, limited, case, study
Quote paper
Khalid Muaz (Author), 2014, The Influence of Motivation on Workers of the Ghana Commercial Bank Limited, Munich, GRIN Verlag, https://www.grin.com/document/469601

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