Ready for eLearning? An Investigation at a Private Higher Educational Institution in Gauteng, South Africa


Bachelor Thesis, 2018
74 Pages

Excerpt

Table of Contents

ii DEFINITION OF TERMS

iii LIST OF ACRONYMS

iv ANNEXURES

v TABLES

vi FIGURES

1 CHAPTER ONE: BACKGROUND AND INTRODUCTION
1.1 Introduction
1.2 Background
1.3 Problem Statement
1.4 Aim of the Study
1.5 Research Objectives
1.6 Research Hypotheses
1.7 Literature Review
1.7.1 Define eLearning and potential business benefits
1.7.2 Defining a mixed learning business model
1.7.3 Bridging the eLearning divide
1.7.4 The future of learning
1.3 Methodological Plan
1.4 Research Methods/Design
1.5 Population of research
1.6 Sample Size
1.7 Research instruments
1.8 Possible Limitations
1.8.1 Receiving rich enough data to proof the hypothesis and enough in-depth answers to address the relevant questions formulated
1.8.2 Availability of Stakeholders to conduct interviews
1.8.3 Time management during break seasons of learners
1.8.4 The potential ITC infrastructure challenges required for adoption of a mixed learning business model
1.9 Data analysis methods
1.10 Conclusion

2 CHAPTER TWO: LITERATURE REVIEW
2.1 Introduction
2.2 Literature review
2.2.1 Define eLearning and potential business benefits
2.2.2 Defining a mixed learning business model
2.2.3 Bridging the eLearning divide
2.2.4 The future of learning
2.3 Conclusion

3 CHAPTER THREE: RESEARCH METHODOLOGY
3.1 Introduction
3.2 Research Methods/ Designs
3.3 Data Collection
3.4 Population of the Study
3.5 Sampling Procedure
3.6 Research Instruments
3.6 Research Limitations
3.7 Reliability and Validity
3.8 Ethical Concerns
3.9 Data Processing
3.10 Conclusion

4 CHAPTER FOUR: RESEARCH RESULTS
4.1 Introduction
4.2 Data Analysis presentation
4.3 Summary of Data collected
Table 4.3: Summary of Data
Staff demographics:
Conclusions from Staff Responses
4.6 Conclusion

5 CHAPTER FIVE: SUMMARY OF FINDINGS AND CONCLUSIONS
5.1 Overview of Study
5.1.1 The research outline
5.2 Major Findings of the Study
5.2.1 Findings based on the questionnaires completed by students (quantitative data)
5.2.2 Findings based on the questionnaires completed by staff (quantitative data)
5.5.3 Conclusion
5.3 Limitations of the Study
5.4 Recommendations
5.5 Recommendations for the future studies
5.6 Concluding Remarks

6 Bibliography and References

i) DEFINITION OF TERMS

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

ii) LIST OF ACRONYMS

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

iii) ANNEXURES

Annexure A: Permission Letter
Annexure B: Questionnaire Sample

iv) TABLES

Table 2.1 Effective Measure February 2017 demographics survey

Table 3.1 Benefits of using different research approaches

Table 3.2: Ethical Principles

Table 4.1: Questionnaire Questions with Category

Table 4.3: Summary of Data

v) FIGURES

Figure 2.1: Diffusion of Innovation based on (Rogers, 1995)

Figure 3.1: Illustration of a Sample

Figure 4.2 a: Gender

Figure 4.2 b: Age

Figure 4.2 c: Ethnicity

Figure 4.3 a: Exposure to eLearning

Figure 4.3 b: Describe eLearning

Figure 4.3 c: eLearning is thus (Select all that apply)

Figure 4.4 a: Money Saver (Students)

Figure 4.4 b: Skills required

Figure 4.4 c: Why not eLearning

Figure 4.4 e: Level of enrolment

Figure 4.4 f: Field of Study

Figure 4.4 g: Perceived Value

Figure 4.4 h: Benefit from eLearning

Figure 4.4 i: Devices

Figure 4.4 j: Discipline

Figure 4.4 k: Adoption Rate

1 CHAPTER ONE: BACKGROUND AND INTRODUCTION

1.1 Introduction

Classroom after classroom and “death by PowerPoint” is this really the only way to study? Absolutely NOT! In the age where information is king, and rich media is around every corner, it is time to realise that digital media and the information age is here to stay and set a new platform for learner to utilise. Rich Media is a toolbox for creativity, enriched user experiences and new technology engagements and thus potentially debunks the arguments against the use of eLearning. Rich Media allows for more functionality and better than before interaction than standard eLearning models from years before (Ad Solutions, 2018).

According to Alonso (2005: 217) eLearning is a platforms that offer a more convenient, elastic and on demand learning experience. Boiling down eLearning is basically learning that is facilitated and supported via information and communications technology (ICT). This assumes that the Private Higher Education (hereon referred to as PHEI) Institution is equipped with the relevant knowledge and skill required of information and communication infrastructures for the adoption of eLearning. eLearning has already been widely accepted by the corporate industry for many years, the next statement was made 18 years ago to support this fact; According to Urdan and Weggen (2000:1) “Corporate eLearning is one of the fastest growing and, we believe, most promising markets in the education industry”. The American Society for Training and Development (ASTD) defines eLearning as a broad set of applications and processes which include web-based learning, computer-based learning, virtual classrooms, and other digital mediums (Alonso, 2005: 218).

There are already quite a few service providers in the educational sector in South Africa that strive to incorporate electronic education technology in their delivery strategies, thus a mixed or blended learning business model. The vast expansion of the smart devices market (discussed later) that are already highly enabled to offer eLearning provides great opportunities for learning on the fly. For these reasons alone online courses have huge potential in South Africa, as to traditional forms of education that are highly restricted compared to the advantages that eLearning provides (Ischebeck, 2017).

Understanding these concepts and definitions of eLearning is therefore key to understand the far reaching potential and the specific learning shortcomings eLearning addresses in today’s demanding lifestyle for both the learners and HEI. With the use of various rich media types available in the information age today eLearning can be delivered over the World Wide Web, mobile devices, virtual classrooms and virtual or augmented reality design classes. The delivery methods are expanding as technology grows and expands into different avenues (Prebble, 2005).

All these mediums imply a “Just-in-time” instructional and learning approach and also assumes that learners adopting eLearning would have the skills required to utilize applications or web-based tools provided by eLearning.

Regardless of the definition chosen there are people such as, designers, developers, and implementers that make use of tools and instructional designs to make the experience a more pleasant and successful one. eLearning is simply just a medium that delivers learning, and like any other medium, it has its advantages and disadvantages (Alonso, 2005: 218).

eLearning covers a wide array of activities from supported learning, to blended or hybrid learning models (the combination of traditional and eLearning practices), to learning that occurs 100% online (Mayer, 2003).

This study will only focus on a most basic form of a blended learning business model that would include a web-tool like Skype to be installed on the facilitator’s laptops where learners can view the presentation content and listen to the lecture. Skype also has the ability to add a chatroom function that learners can ask questions during a live presentation. Skype is a free downloadable product.

It is logical then to deduct that all relevant stakeholders of a traditional classroom based training facility will be investigated for the understating, readiness and willingness to embrace an era of change. This study will also have to determine the current state of business learning model and indicate the readiness for injection of eLearning at any level of the current business model.

1.2 Background

“Learning is central in knowledge-based societies and economies. In many countries there is a push to reflect this by ensuring that reforms of the education system focus more strongly on learning itself rather than simply changing structures and educational organisation” (21st Century Learning: Research, Innovation and Policy , 2004)

One huge differences between eLearning and classroom training is that classroom training allows learners to actively interact, engage with instructors and other fellow learners. The instructor can move the learners around, group them in different ways in order to provide the most effective learning experience. The same content that is used in the classroom can be presented with the aid of eLearning business model tools, thus utilising electronic media (Alonso, 2005)

The African middle class society is increasing rapidly in South Africa especially closing the social class gap between lower middle class and middle class. This class places a demand on alternative and flexible lifestyles. This factor contributes to the likely success of adoption in electronic learning products and initiatives. Smartphones are increasingly affordable in Africa to the general populace making it possible to remotely log in to online learning platforms that offer electronic assisted educational facilities (Ischebeck, 2017).

South Africa has a very different approach with the digital age. Market needs vary, and unique challenges with regards to affordability and accessibility exits. Affordability pertaining to the costs of mobile technology and accessibility of the World Wide Web and the data costs relating to that, i.e. Electricity cost.

This statistic shows the number of smartphone users in South Africa from 2014 to 2022 that has grown from 9.7 million users to 20.3 million users today. The numbers keep growing and by 2019 it is estimated to reach close to 22 million smartphone users and is expected to reach over 25 million by 2022. In 2017, the number of smartphone users worldwide was estimated to be approximately 2.32 billion and could grow to 2.87 billion by 2020 (Statista, 2018).

This means knowing that over 75% of all website traffic in South Africa comes from mobile devices (thus not only cell phones),strongly advocates that your content needs to be device agnostic (QWERTY , 2017:5).

The South African middle class continues to be part of the pivot as they place a high demand for flexible educational services that is in tandem with a busy and fast lifestyle (Ischebeck, 2017).

The most unrated and obvious benefit of any online or electronic learning platform is bridging the physical distance and cost effectiveness gap. With online learning students can access conveniently, as per demand, learning resources, and this comes with the support of a tutor and even a 24/7 available help desk. Learners that cannot physically be in a classroom now suddenly have the opportunity to access a wealth of information at a fraction of the cost of traditional classroom training costs (Ischebeck, 2017).

This mixed or blended business model will thus generate additional streams of business once correctly applied. More learners can now access the same training without physically being in class thus supporting the adoption of an eLearning model at PHEI in South Africa.

1.3 Problem Statement

In this country there are approximately 11 886 912 people that have attained and graduated from high school over the years (802 431 learners attempted to pass during the 2017 year exams with a 76% pass rate) and only a staggering 1 235 250 people have graduated from a HE institution with a Bachelor’s degree in South Africa in total. That means merely 10% of matriculates will have a degree after their studies. That leaves a massive amount of uneducated and potentially unemployed people. The reasons for these current gaps vary from basic connectivity to the World Wide Web, cost of electricity to transport costs (Statistics South Africa, 2016: 43).

This research wants to address a portion of the Private Higher Educational ecosystem by looking at different adoption approaches of basic eLearning models that could bridge these gaps in the market. Damelin Menlyn PHE institutions still only offer strict classroom based training learning models and for unknown reasons do not utilise the eLearning business model, thus not gaining the potential benefits. The later mentioned business model statistics should clearly indicate that there is a massive opportunity to reach more learners, quicker and more effectively, at a lower price point. There are already South African PHE institutions that utilize some sections of eLearning as part of a blended learning experience.

Arguments have been mage that the scarcity of introducing eLearning at PHE institutions today could be financial, lack of understanding, lack of skill or any number of unknown factors that withhold adoption of eLearning. Thus these eLearning laggards potentially opens the opportunity for adoption at their competition and thus losing market share. Traditional classroom based face-to-face training combined with eLearning suddenly creates an entirely new experience for learners and creates new business opportunities by increasing the amount of learners to educate and potentially can address the low matriculation to degree qualification transition ratio (Bates, 2015).

1.4 Aim of the Study

The aim of this research is to investigate how an eLearning business model will assist and complement the current business model of a PHE institution in South Africa. This research will investigate both the PHE institution’s point of view and that of the learners in this regard.

1.5 Research Objectives

The objectives of the research is as follow:

5.1 To determine both learner and institution predisposition towards what a basic mixed learning business model.
5.2 To assess and analyse the potential learning curve required (skills) for both institution and learner to make adoption successful for eLearning.
5.3 To assess and determine the adoption success factors of eLearning for both staff and learners at a HE institution.

1.6 Research Hypotheses

6.1.1 It is hypothesised that a mixed learning business model that includes basic eLearning will create an additional benefit of bridging the physical divide for both learner and PHE institution of having all learners in one classroom.
6.1.2 It is hypothesised that using the World Wide Web and/or mobile device driven platforms provide both institutions and learners with more flexible, cost-effective and consistent learning options.
6.1.3 It is also hypothesised that eLearning will require more learner dedication and self-discipline.
6.1.4 It is hypothesised that the use of more creative learning content presentations form PHE institutions will aid to successful adoption of eLearning.

1.7 Literature Review

An indicative manageable literature review on the introduction and adoption of an eLearning business model into a traditional classroom at a HE institution while assessing its viability, potential revenue streams and the overall inclination or predisposing towards a mixed learning environment (Quinlan et al., 2015)

Sections presented with subheadings below are founded on the research objectives formulated and derived from the problem statement (Quinlan et al., 2015: 90).

1.7.1 Define eLearning and potential business benefits

eLearning is typically learning conducted via electronic media, but not limited to only the World Wide Web (the internet). Within the electronic media there has been incredible advances made over the last few years. eLearning can simply mean connecting distance learning students to the same classroom session via a web-based tool, like Skype (OECD, 2005: 80). This tool allows learners that are not in the classroom to view the presentation, listen to the conversation and ask questions via a chatroom facility.

eLearning can in its more complex forms even involve Virtual reality or artificial reality classrooms, but in between this and the simple forms there are many options that can be explored based on the business model a facility has an appetite for (eLearning Design, 2018).

1.7.2 Defining a mixed learning business model

Mixing standard classroom, face-to-face instructor led training with any other form of training being it be eLearning would be described as a mixed learning business model.

A response from Brian Schreuder, Deputy Director-General: Curriculum and Assessment Management at the Western Cape Education Department stated that “We shared our 20-year vision for e-learning and the strategy and plans to make it happen. It is a strategy that will transform education and change pedagogy to improve teaching and learning so that learners achieve better, but are also better equipped for the 21st-century world of work, study and living. We plan to create an enabling environment in which 21st-century teaching and learning can take place using digital resources to enhance learning. While the strategy has medium- to long-term turnaround deliverables, the initial phase is a three-year Game Changer phase” (Meyer, 2016).

The second you introduce another form of learning to your current business model, you are adding variety, flexibility and potentially additional revenue streams that constitutes a mixed or blended learning model. In a mixed mode: students are required to participate in online activities, e.g. online discussions, assessment, online project/collaborative work, as part of course work, which replace part of face-to-face, teaching / learning. Significant campus attendance remains (OECD, 2005).

1.7.3 Bridging the eLearning divide

The pedagogical arguments regarding the adoption of eLearning in HE institutions opens creates a chasm that will require some counter arguments to bridge the gap between realities and potential benefits of e-Learning (Moore et al, 1999)

The Law of diffusion of innovation is part of the study of the adoption rate of eLearning. Thus the Diffusion of innovations is a theory that attempts to better explain how, why, and at what rate new ideas and technology spread. There is however a point where the adoption rate reaches a critical mass. These adoption categories are as follows and illustrated in Figure 1 below; innovators, early adopters, early majority, late majority, and laggards (Rogers, 1995)

An example of or practical application of this would be when a new apple iPhone model is released. Only the innovators will sleep in a long line in front of a store to be the first people to actually get a new iPhone. Once either the word spreads, more product is available and positive articles start to appear will the early adaptors start to buy the product. As time passes the early majority and late majority buying the new phones. They usually would only do so because their contracts have expired or they have saved up to buy the product. The laggards are the people that will only buy this new iPhone if in the extreme case they are forced to buy, for example; their old phone broke. The same principle applies to most product.

1.7.4 The future of learning

Examples of the future and development of computer aided training. Flight simulators, virtual reality, augmented reality and Microsoft HoloLens, to name but a few all have the following benefits (Sing, 2016):

- Cost Difference: With increased tuition fees it is no wonder that the low cost of eLearning is a very attractive option for many learners.
- Availability and Flexibility: Always available on demand 24/7 eLearning, eliminating the need to travel and utilising dispensable income more effectively.
- Reporting and Monitoring: Another benefit of eLearning is the LMS (Learning Management System) that gives instant feedback and monitors the learners live progress, doing away with the need for additional administration.
- Content and Delivery Consistency: This benefit is more the same a fast-food chain that we are familiar with and expect the same food and service does not matter where the location is in the world. This is the case with eLearning, the content will always be the same, and the consistency might only depend on access to the internet (Sing, 2016).

In conclusion we notice that even in South Africa high speed internet is becoming a big drive (ADSL vs High Speed Fiber), the proliferation of smart devices and ubiquitous computing has impacted the landscape of all known ways of human life today and will continue doing so. Every year sees the computing power and speed of devices double as predicted by an electronic engineer called Moore, now referred to as Moor’s Law (Investopedia, 2018).

Thus the development of above mentioned benefits drives, the education sector to a point and/or forefront of adopting electronic and computing aided methods of learning to increase efficiency and productivity, cutting costs and increasing the speed at which learners learn (Ischebeck, 2017).

1.3 Methodological Plan

The methodological plan provides a brief summary of research methodologies that are used in this research (William, 2006). In this plan we will discuss the method design, population selection, sampling criteria and potential barriers that might hinder the research. Thus this will be the structure that underpins the research (Quinlan et al., 2015).

1.4 Research Methods/Design

This research will make use of mixed design. Qualitative and quantitative methods will be used in this research. Qualitative Research is used to uncover trends in thought and opinions, and dive deeper into the problem. Qualitative data collection methods vary using unstructured or semi-structured techniques. Some common methods include focus groups, individual interviews, and participation/observations (Quinlan et al., 2015).

Quantitative methods emphasize objective measurements and the statistical, mathematical, or numerical analysis of data collected through polls, questionnaires, and surveys, or by manipulating pre-existing statistical data using computational techniques. Thus the data collection can either be qualitative or quantitative that will prove or disprove the research hypothesis and questions formulated in the research (Fife-Schaw et al., 2012)

Qualitative design will assist with better in-depth understanding of the appetite for adoption, thus readiness of the institution for an eLearning business model. Quantitative will be used to investigate the skills, and readiness from a learner point of view (Quinlan et al., 2015). A comparative benefits table is available later in Chapter 3. The research design refers to the overall strategy chosen that aids the integration of all the different components of the research study in a coherent and logical way, thereby, ensuring that the research problem will be effectively addressed; thus it could constitutes a blueprint for the collection, measurement, and analysis of data (Quinlan et al., 2015).

This research being of mixed nature will lean towards a descriptive research design that will include variations of surveys and interviews. This will address the need for both in-depth understanding from an institution point of view and overall feedback from a learner point of view.

1.5 Population of research

Research population is as a well-defined collection of individuals or objects known to have similar characteristics. All individuals or objects within a certain population usually have a common, binding characteristic or trait (Quinlan et al., 2015: 168). Potential population for the research will be based on the collective group of individuals involved in a HE institution at Damelin Menlyn Branch.

This will include staff members involved with business strategy and facilitators that work with learners. The learners will also form part of the population from an eLearning user perspective of the products delivered by the institution.

1.6 Sample Size

A Sample is a subset of a larger population. Different sampling techniques can be used and they are usually split into probability sampling or non-probability sampling. Some examples are, random sampling where each individual in the population has an equal chance of being selected; Stratified sampling is where a researcher divides the population into groups based on characteristics, and then the researcher randomly selects from each group based on its size (Quinlan et al., 2015 : 179).

The sampling would only apply to both learners and facility staff members that would complement the research objectives. In other words, if there are specific departments that would not require the use of eLearning then those individuals or departments would be excluded from the sample size, for instance admin staff and finance staff.

A selection of at least 100 learners covering all age groups that fit the sample criteria would be selected and at least 4 relevant institution staff members will form part of the sample size. Thus staff members from business, marketing and facilitators.

1.7 Research instruments

Questionnaires will be used in this study to collect data and determine the probabilities of adoption of a mixed eLearning business model.

The purpose of using questionnaires will be aimed at the learners/students data collection whereas the staff questionnaires will mainly be aimed at the relevant stakeholders of the institution (Payne, 2004).

The reason for using questionnaires are the fact that data can be collected relatively quickly because the researcher would not need to be present when the questionnaires were completed and the questionaries’ can be sent via mail or using web-tools like survey monkey (Quinlan et al., 2015: 267).

1.8 Possible Limitations

1.8.1 Receiving rich enough data to proof the hypothesis and enough in-depth answers to address the relevant questions formulated.

1.8.2 Availability of Stakeholders to conduct interviews

1.8.3 Time management during break seasons of learners

1.8.4 The potential ITC infrastructure challenges required for adoption of a mixed learning business model.

1.9 Data analysis methods

Since this research applies a mixed method a decision to use coding for both quantitative and qualitative methods was used. In social science, coding is an analytical process in which data, in both quantitative form (such as questionnaires results) or qualitative (such as interview transcripts) is categorized to facilitate analysis (Hay, 2005).

In qualitative research values coding can be used in an attempt to exhibit the inferred values, attitudes and beliefs of participants. In doing so, the research may discern patterns in world views (Hay, 2005).

1.10 Conclusion

The successful adoption of information and communication technology to enhance learning to an eLearning level can be a very challenging on many levels, requiring a complex blend of technological, pedagogical and organizational components, which may at times require the resolution of contradictory demands and conflicting needs. Thus finding a midway or compromise might not be the best route to follow for the simple reasons and benefits outlined in this study.

The research reported in this paper will investigate and analyse critical success factors that are required to deliver eLearning within Private Higher Education courses and programs, in this instance creating a mixed learning environment.

The research does in no means gather information from any professional or expert in the field of eLearning and bases the finding purely on the statistics and feedback from potential users and institutions delivering this type of business model.

2 CHAPTER TWO: LITERATURE REVIEW

2.1 Introduction

A literature review is an evaluative report of information found in the literature related to this document topic and thus selected area of study. The review should describe, summarise, evaluate and clarify this literature relating to the chosen topic. It should give a theoretical base for the research and help the writer determine the nature of the research. Works which are irrelevant should be discarded and those which are peripheral should be looked at critically (CQ University Library, 2018)

A literature review is more than the search for information that goes far beyond being just a descriptive rationalized bibliography. It is thus very important that all finding included in the review must be read, evaluated and analysed. Relationships must also be highlighted between the literature identified and articulated, in relation the field of research (Bates, 2015).

"In writing the literature review, the purpose is to convey to the reader what knowledge and ideas have been established on a topic, and what their strengths and weaknesses are. The literature review must be defined by a guiding concept (e.g. your research objective, the problem or issue you are discussing, or your argumentative thesis). It is not just a descriptive list of the material available, or a set of summaries" (CQ University Library, 2018).

This research is an indicative manageable literature review on the introduction and adoption of an eLearning business model into a traditional classroom at a HE institution while assessing its viability, potential revenue streams and the overall inclination or predisposing towards a mixed learning environment (Quinlan et al., 2015)

Sections presented with subheadings below are founded on the research objectives formulated and derived from the problem statement (Quinlan et al., 2015: 90).

These sections will also be set in context to the research questions and provide a logical structure. The structure will then consist of justification of the research, identify research similar or relating to the topic that either supports or identifies gaps in the research. This will then enable the reader to learn more about the chosen topic.

2.2 Literature review

2.2.1 Define eLearning and potential business benefits

eLearning is typically learning conducted via electronic media, but not limited to only the World Wide Web (the internet). Within the electronic media there has been incredible advances made over the last few years. eLearning can simply mean connecting distance learning students to the same classroom session via a web-based tool, like Skype (OECD, 2005: 80). This tool allows learners that are not in the classroom to view the presentation, listen to the conversation and ask questions via a chatroom facility.

eLearning can in its more complex forms even involve Virtual reality or artificial reality classrooms, but in between this and the simple forms there are many options that can be explored based on the business model a facility has an appetite for (eLearning Design, 2018).

This subsection relates to the first and second hypothesis in the research l;

- It is hypothesised that a mixed learning business model that includes basic eLearning will create an additional benefit of bridging the physical divide for both learner and HE institution of having all learners in one classroom.
- It is hypothesised that using the World Wide Web and/or mobile device driven platforms provide both institutions and learners with more flexible, cost-effective and consistent learning options.

These hypothesis’s addresses the introduction of a basic mixed business model as means of bridging a gap and the use of mobile device driven platforms as possible advantage. The hypothesis wants to bridge the physical divide between learners and institutions with the use of modern technology and thus introducing flexibility, cost-effective and consistent learning options (MYBROADBAND, 2018).

Modern being the operative word here. South Africa has a massive basic internet infrastructure but it does not reach everywhere geographically and in some places the quality (speed and reliability) of the connection is not conducive to distant learning. The following survey indicates and highlights some challenges facing the building of an eLearning business model.

In February, Effective Measure performed 285,000 demographics surveys on South African Internet users. The survey data resulted in an almost even gender split of Internet users in South Africa. It also shows that most local Internet users are below the age of 35, and mainly reside in cities and large towns (MYBROADBAND, 2018).

The table below provides a quick overview of the results of the Effective Measure February 2017 demographics survey (MYBROADBAND, 2018).

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

Table 2.1: Effective Measure February 2017 demographics survey (MYBROADBAND, 2018).

[...]

Excerpt out of 74 pages

Details

Title
Ready for eLearning? An Investigation at a Private Higher Educational Institution in Gauteng, South Africa
Course
BCom Marketing and Business Management
Author
Year
2018
Pages
74
Catalog Number
V494807
ISBN (eBook)
9783346006950
ISBN (Book)
9783346006967
Language
English
Tags
ready, investigation, private, higher, educational, institution, gauteng, south, africa
Quote paper
Johan Westman (Author), 2018, Ready for eLearning? An Investigation at a Private Higher Educational Institution in Gauteng, South Africa, Munich, GRIN Verlag, https://www.grin.com/document/494807

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