Pre-Service TVET Teachers’ Perceptions of their Readiness to Integrate ICT in the Curriculum


Academic Paper, 2019
23 Pages

Excerpt

Table of Contents

Introduction

Statement of the Problem

Purpose of the Study

Research Questions

Theoretical Framework

Delimitations and Limitations of the Study

Significance of the Study

Literature Review

The New Realities Facing Teacher Training Programmes

Technology Self-Efficacy and Technology Integration

Research Methodology

Results

Conclusion

Recommendations

Future Research

References

Abstract

The Jamaican Government with support from UNESCO have begun the implementation of the Information and Communications Technology Competency Framework for Teachers (ICT-CFT). A new ICT-CFT Curriculum has been developed from this framework and is currently being piloted at the University of Technology, Jamaica. This study was conducted among the pilot group of pre-service teachers to determine their perceptions of the impact of this new course of study on their abilities to integrate ICT in their specialist areas. Two research questions guided the study. A total of 30 pre-service TVET teacher, two lecturers and the educational technologist were purposefully selected for the study. The sample size was (n =33). A questionnaire and interviews were used to collect data. The findings showed that gender matters as it relates to the perceptions of pre-service TVET teachers and their readiness to integrate ICT in the curriculum. Males demonstrated a higher level of perceptions than their females. There was no difference in the perceptions of males and females towards their preparation to integrate ICT in the curriculum. Factors such as age group, prior exposure to ICT, and previous teaching experience, were not significant. The interview findings suggested that peer support and adequate technical support were among the factors that can impact the pre-service TVET teachers’ mastery of integration of ICT in the curriculum. Recommendations were made on supporting the pre-service TVET teachers, modeling effective technology integration, promoting self-efficacy, and observing the pre-service TVET teachers during the practicum.

Keywords: Integration of ICT, pre-service TVET teachers, curriculum, TPACK model

Introduction

In recent times, the integration of Information and Communication Technologies (ICT) in the curriculum has been quite topical in Jamaica, the Caribbean, and the world at large. Such conversation is fueled by the notion that digital tools such as computers, mobile tools, projection systems, software, and the Internet are now conceived as ‘basic infrastructure’ within schools (Ruggiero & Mong, 2015). Many institutions at different levels are now forced to make provisions for the Millennials by ensuring that teachers are adequately prepared to adequately engage the students using modern techniques and methodologies. The increased access to ICTs in schools and the need to satisfy the interests of the Millennials has resulted in an expectation that technology-enhanced teaching will improve learning outcomes for these students (Barreto & Orey, 2014; Hew & Brush, 2007; Koc & Bakir, 2010; Laferrière, Hamel, & Searson, 2013). Technology integration has, therefore, become a basic job requirement for teachers in contemporary society (Lawless & Pellegrino, 2007; Ruggiero & Mong, 2015; Teo, 2011).

In its response, the Government of Jamaica with support from UNESCO has begun the implementation of the ICT Competency Framework for Teachers (ICT-CFT) to improve teacher’s ability to integrate technology in the curriculum. A new ICT-CFT curriculum has been developed based on this framework to replace the existing curriculum in all teacher training institutions. The curriculum is designed to equip teachers with the requisite knowledge and competencies to integrate ICT in the curriculum.

The University of Technology (UTech), Jamaica (UTech, is currently piloting the new ICT-CFT curriculum among pre-service TVET teachers. It is anticipated that the pre-service teachers will adopt the constructivist model and acquire competencies for integrating ICT across the components of the 21st learning environment.

Statement of the Problem

The demands of the 21st century related to the acquisition of ICT competencies by professionals in practically every industry is one reality facing educational institutions. Both pre-service and in-service teachers are now expected to demonstrate the necessary competencies to integrate ICT into the curriculum while educating pupils to become proficient in using ICT tools and application (Griffin, McGaw, & Care, 2012). In response to this reality, many teacher training institutions have included introductory ICT courses in their curriculum, specifically designed to improve on the development of ICT knowledge and skills of the teachers in training (Polly, Mims, Shepherd & Inan, 2010). There are concerns, however, that preservice teachers are not ideally prepared to effectively integrate technology into their classrooms (Ottenbreit-Leftwich, Glazewski, Newby & Ertmer, 2010; Tondeur et al., 2012), specifically due to a gap between their technical ICT skills and the knowledge of the good pedagogical practice.

The review of the literature showed that a lot of studies have been done on the a integrate ICT into the curriculum and the acquisition of ICT competencies (Griffin, McGaw & Care, 2012; Polly, Mims, Shepherd & Inan, 2010; Ottenbreit-Leftwich, Glazewski, Newby & Ertmer, 2010; Tondeur et al., 2012). However, there is limited literature on the readiness of pre-service TVET teachers. Therefore, there is a need to investigate how ready and willing the pre-service TVET teachers are to incorporate ICT into the curriculum.

Purpose of the Study

The main purpose of this study was to investigate pre-service teachers’ perceptions of their readiness to integrate ICT in the curriculum at UTech, Jamaica, and therefore providing important information to guide the piloting of the new ICT for Educators 1 programme.

Research Questions

The following questions guided the study:

1. How does the gender of pre-service TVET teachers’ influence the perceptions of their ability to integrate ICT in the curriculum?
2. What are some of the factors that are related to the perception of pre-service TVET teachers as they seek to integrate of ICT in the curriculum?

Theoretical Framework

Following the review of several theoretical frameworks, the Technology Acceptance Model (TAM) and the Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge (TPACK) Model were used based on their relevance to the study. See Figure 1 and 2, respectively for the illustration of the two models.

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

Figure 1. Technology Acceptance Model (Adapted from Davis, 1989)

The TAM was designed by Davis (1989) to determine the attitude of users towards using technology, which influences their behavioural intention to use technology (Ghavifekr & Wan Rosdy, 2015). The model consists of two variables, perceived usefulness and perceived ease of use, which determines one’s attitude towards using technology.

- Perceived usefulness (PU) – refers to how the user believes that the technology will help to improve the performance/efficiency.
- Perceived ease of use (PEOU) – defined as the extent to which the user is comfortable inusing the features of the technology (Ghavifekr & Wan Rosdy, 2015).

Abbildung in dieser Leseprobe nicht enthalten

Figure 2. Technological, Pedagogical, and Content Knowledge Model (Adapted from Chai, Koh & Tsai, 2013)

According to Mishra and Koehler (2006), the TPACK Model is derived from three key knowledge sources, technological knowledge (TK), pedagogical knowledge (PK), and content knowledge (CK). TK, PK, and CK are integrated into the model to describe the foundation for effective integration of ICT in the curriculum. The TPACK framework has been used to re-design teacher education programs, specifically to determine the effectiveness of the design of these programmes (Chai, Ling Koh & Tsai, 2010). TPACK can also serve as a measurement of instructors’ knowledge, their practices, and the ability to effectively integrate technology in the classroom.

Delimitations and Limitations of the Study

The study only focused on one tertiary institution (UTech, Jamaica), and just the perceptions of the pre-service TVET teachers were sought. As a result , some caution must be taken in making generalizations based on the findings of the research, since limitations and delimitations are applicable.

The following limitations were observed: (a) the population of the study was restricted to 26 since only a single group of students selected the course of study, (b) the questionnaire did not provide the participants with opportunities to qualify their answers, (c) in the mixed-methods case study, there was the possibility that the interpretation of the qualitative data analysis could be influenced by the research’s own beliefs and personal philosophy.

Significance of the Study

This study is therefore significant as it seeks to determine the perceptions of a group of pre-service TVET teachers towards their readiness to integrate ICT in the curriculum at UTech, Jamaica. Additionally, the information garnered from this study can be useful to all teacher training institutions in their preparation of both pre-service and in-service TVET teachers to integrate ICT in their specific discipline, as well as to inform policy.

Literature Review

The emergence of digital technologies as major derivatives to achieve successful integration of ICT into the classroom poses a substantial challenge to many pre-service TVET teachers (Abbitt, 2011; Kivunja, 2013). While successful integration might already be the norm for low-tech tools (e.g., non-digital classroom technologies such as pencils, notebooks, and overhead projectors), digital tools may provide teachers with more challenges because of their uncertainty or unfamiliarity with the tools (Barreto & Orey, 2014; Gilakjani, 2013). Preparing pre-service teachers to integrate technology effectively is a meaningful goal, since working with ICT tools and applications in an instructional context can often pose challenges for experienced teachers, more so novice teachers (Copriady, 2014; Lawless & Pellegrino, 2007; Pegler, Kollewyn, & Crichton, 2010; Richardson, Ertmer, Aagard, Ottenbreit, Yang, & Mack, 2008).

Research indicates that inexperienced teachers joining the ranks of practicing educators are no better at technology integration than their more experienced peers (Albion, 2011; Bate, 2010; Ertmer & Ottenbreit-Leftwich, 2010; Pegler et al., 2010; Yong, Gates, & Harrison, 2016). It is further observed that novice teachers may actually be worse than veterans at technology integration, due to their ongoing development in the area of pedagogical knowledge (Gilakjani, 2013; Martin, 2011). The challenge facing many of these novice teachers is that they are expected to be naturally inclined to use technology, and are also required to easily integrate technology into their teaching (Bate, 2010; Pierson & Cozart, 2005; Southall, 2013).

The New Realities Facing Teacher Training Programmes

There is a new school of thought emerging that for the preparation of pre-service teachers to effectively integrate technology in teaching, a rethinking of the approach used is necessary (Lambert & Gong, 2010; Ottenbreit-Leftwich et al., 2010; Wang & Chen, 2007). There is a belief that some pre-service teachers do not have enough exposure to the pedagogical use of ICT, and their expertise in working with computers and other educational technologies is no guarantee that they are adequately prepared for the integration of technology ICT (Brown & Warschauer, 2006; Lim et al., 2013). Understanding how pre-service teachers develop the competencies to effectively integrate technology is fast becoming a necessity in the design and development of teacher education programmes (Amiel, Kubota & Wives, 2016). Excellent teacher preparation programs are therefore judged on how they foster the development of teachers’ integration skills on the basis of the technologies involved, the pedagogical methods needed, and the contextualizing of this integration within their content area (Abbitt, 2011; Mishra & Koehler, 2006; Polly, 2014).

Teacher preparation programs must, therefore, incorporate strategies that determine how the pre-service teachers become acquainted with educational technologies. Approaches such as the modeling of technology integration should be available for teacher educators. Kay (2006) conducted a meta-analysis which described ten different approaches necessary for developing technology integration strategies among pre-service teachers. The analysis identified these approaches as: 1) integrating technology into all courses, 2) using multimedia (e.g., video case studies), 3) developing the education faculty members' skills so that they can integrate technology into their teaching, 4) a stand-alone technology course, 5) modeling effective use of technology, 6) collaboration between colleges and K-12 schools, 7) field-based learning, 8) targeted workshops, 9) improving access to educational technologies, and 10) partnering pre-service teachers with mentor teachers. Kay (2006) noted that some institutions use a combination of these different strategies concurrently.

[...]

Excerpt out of 23 pages

Details

Title
Pre-Service TVET Teachers’ Perceptions of their Readiness to Integrate ICT in the Curriculum
Course
ICT for Educators
Author
Year
2019
Pages
23
Catalog Number
V501866
ISBN (eBook)
9783346051622
Language
English
Notes
I am a supervisor of a staff of lecturers of over 40 persons.
Tags
ICT integration, pedagogy teaching
Quote paper
Junior Martin (Author), 2019, Pre-Service TVET Teachers’ Perceptions of their Readiness to Integrate ICT in the Curriculum, Munich, GRIN Verlag, https://www.grin.com/document/501866

Comments

  • No comments yet.
Read the ebook
Title: Pre-Service TVET Teachers’ Perceptions of their Readiness to Integrate ICT in the Curriculum


Upload papers

Your term paper / thesis:

- Publication as eBook and book
- High royalties for the sales
- Completely free - with ISBN
- It only takes five minutes
- Every paper finds readers

Publish now - it's free